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Magical Marizanne Kapp leads South Africa to historic first ODI win over Australia

Magical Marizanne Kapp leads South Africa to historic first ODI win over Australia
Marizanne Kapp of South Africa appeals successfully for the wicket of Phoebe Litchfield of Australia at North Sydney Oval during game two of the Women’s One Day International series on 7 February 2024 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo: Mark Metcalfe / Getty Images)

Marizanne Kapp’s 75 runs and crippling spell of bowling led South Africa to a thumping 84-run win over Australia.

The Proteas women beat Australia by 84 runs on the Duckworth-Lewis method in the second One Day International of three, at North Sydney Oval on Wednesday. 

magical marizanne proteas australia win

Marizanne Kapp of South Africa celebrates with Laura Wolvaardt after taking the wicket of Beth Mooney of Australia during game two of the Women’s One Day International series between Australia and South Africa at North Sydney Oval on 7 February 2024. (Photo: Mark Metcalfe /Getty Images)

It was South Africa’s first ODI victory over the hosts. They recorded their first win over the same opposition in any format two weeks ago, when they won a T20.

Wednesday’s win was set up by South Africa’s premier all-rounder Marizanne Kapp. 

The 34-year-old is often South Africa’s most important player, with both bat and ball. When she plays well, the side generally does well. 

On Wednesday she was once again brilliant with both, striking a match-high 75 off 87 deliveries to set up South Africa’s total of 229 for six before taking the wickets of Australia’s top three batters.

marizanne kapp

Marizanne Kapp of South Africa celebrates taking the wicket of Alyssa Healy of Australia during game two of the Women’s One Day International series between Australia and South Africa at North Sydney Oval on 7 February 2024. (Photo: Mark Metcalfe /Getty Images)

“It’s a proud moment,” Kapp said after the match. “Not only for me, but I think for South African cricket as a whole. We all know we’ve never beaten Australia in a one-day game.

“So to be able to perform and help my team over the lines is obviously a massive achievement for me.”

The closest the Proteas came to beating the side from Down Under before was a tied fixture in Coffs Harbour in 2016. That time, Kapp scored 66 runs and took a wicket.

Comeback 

South Africa’s rain-affected win on Wednesday was made sweeter by the fact that they came back from a chastening eight-wicket loss in Adelaide in the first ODI over the weekend. 

“We got a proper hiding in Adelaide and came out today fighting,” Kapp said. “It wasn’t easy conditions at all, especially with the bat. 

“This win shows a lot of fight and grit from the team and to do it on a tough wicket speaks volumes.”

The player-of-the-match almost didn’t play on Wednesday after being hit by a ball on the elbow in the first encounter. 

“Initially, coming here this morning, I felt 100% and until I started hitting some balls, I felt a bit of pain in my arm,” Kapp said.

“But then, after speaking to our physio and the doctor, they assured me that the pain meds would kick in and luckily they convinced me to play today and everything worked out.”

Slow start 

South Africa’s innings got off to a woeful start after they were put in to bat, with skipper Laura Wolvaardt sent back to the dugout after three balls without troubling the scorers.

Anneke Bosch and Tamzin Brits rebuilt well with a 55-run third-wicket stand. Bosch fell six runs short of her third ODI half-century after Brits mistimed an Annabel Sutherland delivery to lose her wicket. 

marizanne proteas

Marizanne Kapp of South Africa strikes the ball during her batting stint in game two of the Women’s One Day International series between Australia and South Africa at North Sydney Oval on 7 February 2024. (Photo: Mark Metcalfe /Getty Images)

That brought Kapp to the crease. She looked positive from the outset, getting off the mark with a fluent lofted drive. 

She struck the ball well through the offside and punished anything short, clubbing 12 fours, to help the team to a competitive total after two rain interruptions. 

Marizanne Kapp of South Africa bats during game two of the Women’s One Day International series between Australia and South Africa at North Sydney Oval on 7 February 2024. (Photo: Mark Metcalfe /Getty Images)

Chloe Tryon helped to finish the innings off strongly with an unbeaten 37 runs off 36 balls, including a massive six off Megan Schutt over the legside. 

The 229 (adjusted to 233) for the loss of six wickets in 45 overs was always going to be a tough chase with the rain injecting some venom into the wicket. 

Kapp exploited every bit of movement and extra bounce, getting rid of Alyssa Healy, Phoebe Litchfield and Beth Mooney in her opening four overs. Her figures at that stage read: four overs, one maiden and three wickets with only eight runs conceded.

Kapp bowled only one more over in the innings, before 19-year-old debutant Ayanda Hlubi and 21-year-old Eliz-Mari Marx, who has played only four matches, picked up two wickets apiece. 

All-rounder Nadine de Klerk also claimed two vital Aussie scalps.

“I batted for nearly batted two hours, and I’m 34 years old,” Kapp said about bowling only five overs. “It’s starting to get tough. 

“If that was my younger days, you wouldn’t have been able to take the ball out of my hands.

“It’s a long series and I know that the next match is going to be important. It was just a bit of management in terms of South Africa.”

Kapp admitted that she was “relieved” by the young South African bowlers picking up important scalps, meaning she did not have to come back into the attack.

“I was so relieved, I’m not going to lie, because that meant I could just ease off a little bit,” she said.

“They’re two upcoming youngsters. I love the way they bowled. Hopefully, big things will come for them in their careers.” DM

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