RECIPE BOOK

A dish from Yotam Ottolenghi’s new book ‘Flavour’

By The Reading List 17 September 2020

Jonathan Lovekin/Penguin/Composite: The Reading List

Ottolenghi at his pioneering best: Try Chaat Masala Potatoes With Yoghurt and Tamarind from his new cookbook, Flavour

Flavour is the third installment in Yotam Ottolenghi’s bestselling and multi-award-winning Plenty series, which has sold over two million copies.

This new book celebrates the limitless potential of vegetables and reveals how to transform them into magical dishes. Ottolenghi and co-writer Ixta Belfrage break down the three factors that create flavour and offer innovative simple recipes for weeknights, low-effort high-impact dishes, and standout meals for the relaxed cook.

***

This dish is inspired by aloo chaat, an Indian street food that has many regional variations, all of which are not for the faint-hearted because they are loaded with sweet and sour and a fair bit of crunch. This is a slightly tamer version, though still pretty ‘noisy’, both in flavour and looks. It’s absolutely perfect for a weekend lunch, alongside other vegetables such as the aubergine with herbs and crispy garlic, or the radish and cucumber salad with chipotle peanuts. You can also serve it as a side with roasted lamb or chicken.

Chaat masala is the slightly tangy spice mix that gives this dish its distinctive flavour. It gets its sharpness from amchoor, dried mango powder, which is used widely in Indian cooking as a souring agent. You’d recognise the flavour from samoosas and pakoras, where it is often used.

Both the coriander chutney and the tamarind sauce are great condiments to have on hand to brighten up sandwiches and wraps, to spoon over eggs, or to serve alongside tofu or fish. Double or triple them, if you like – the coriander chutney will keep in the fridge for up to a week and the tamarind sauce for up to two weeks.

***

Chaat Masala Potatoes With Yoghurt and Tamarind

Serves four
As a side

Ingredients

  • 750g baby new potatoes, cut lengthways into 1cm-thick slices
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp chaat masala
  • ½ tsp ground turmeric
  • 250g Greek-style yoghurt
  • ½ small red onion, peeled and thinly sliced into rounds on a mandolin, if you have one, or by hand (45g)
  • 1 green chilli, thinly sliced into rounds (10g)
  • 1½ tsp coriander seeds, toasted
  • 1½ tsp nigella seeds, toasted
  • salt

Coriander Chutney

  • 30g fresh coriander
  • 1 green chilli, deseeded and roughly chopped (10g)
  • 1 tbsp lime juice
  • 60ml olive oil

Sweet Tamarind Dressing

  • 1½ tbsp shop-bought tamarind paste, or double if you’re extracting it yourself from pulp
  • 1½ tsp caster sugar
  • ¼ tsp chaat masala

***

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 220°C fan.
  2. Put the potatoes and 2 teaspoons of salt into a medium saucepan and top with enough cold water to cover by about 4cm. Place on a medium-high heat, bring to the boil, then simmer for 6 minutes, or until they’re almost cooked through but still retain a bite. Drain through a sieve and pat dry, then transfer to a large parchment-lined baking tray and toss with the oil, chaat masala, turmeric, ⅓ teaspoon of salt and a good grind of  pepper. Roast, stirring once or twice, for 35 minutes, or until deeply golden.
  3. Meanwhile, make the coriander chutney. Put all the ingredients and ¼ teaspoon of salt into the small bowl of a food processor and blitz until smooth. Set aside until needed.
  4. For the tamarind dressing, whisk together all the ingredients in a small bowl with 1½ teaspoons of water and set aside.
  5. Spread the yoghurt out on a large round serving platter. Top with the coriander chutney, swirling it through without completely incorporating.

Drizzle with half  the tamarind dressing and top with the potatoes, onion and chilli. Drizzle over the remaining tamarind, then sprinkle over the seeds and serve. DM/ML

Ottolenghi Flavour by Yotam Ottolenghi and Ixta Belfrage is published by Ebury (R580). Visit The Reading List for South African book news – including recipes! – daily.

Gallery

Comments - share your knowledge and experience

Please note you must be a Maverick Insider to comment. Sign up here or if you are already an Insider.

Everybody has an opinion but not everyone has the knowledge and the experience to contribute meaningfully to a discussion. That’s what we want from our members. Help us learn with your expertise and insights on articles that we publish. We encourage different, respectful viewpoints to further our understanding of the world. View our comments policy here.

No Comments, yet

OP-ED

The Cape’s spring flower spectacle: Building back better with wildflowers as our guides

By Matthew Child