Ramaphosa's energy plan Webinar banner

We'd like our readers to start paying for Daily Maverick

More specifically, we'd like those who can afford to pay to start paying. What it comes down to is whether or not you value Daily Maverick. Think of us in terms of your daily cappuccino from your favourite coffee shop. It costs around R35. That’s R1,050 per month on frothy milk. Don’t get us wrong, we’re almost exclusively fuelled by coffee. BUT maybe R200 of that R1,050 could go to the journalism that’s fighting for the country?

We don’t dictate how much we’d like our readers to contribute. After all, how much you value our work is subjective (and frankly, every amount helps). At R200, you get it back in Uber Eats and ride vouchers every month, but that’s just a suggestion. A little less than a week’s worth of cappuccinos.

We can't survive on hope and our own determination. Our country is going to be considerably worse off if we don’t have a strong, sustainable news media. If you’re rejigging your budgets, and it comes to choosing between frothy milk and Daily Maverick, we hope you might reconsider that cappuccino.

We need your help. And we’re not ashamed to ask for it.

Our mission is to Defend Truth. Join Maverick Insider.

Support Daily Maverick→
Payment options

At least 40 inmates strangled to death in Amazon prison...

Newsdeck

Newsdeck

At least 40 inmates strangled to death in Amazon prison gang clashes

Pedro Mura, leader of the Mura indigenous people, waits next to the Amazona Theater, for the start of a demonstration held by indigenous peoples in Manaus, Brazil, 20 January 2019. The protest was held to show opposition against the decisions of the Brazilian Federal Government for the revision of the demarcations of the indigenous territories and the withdrawal of the National Foundation of the Indian (FUNAI) of the Ministry of Justice. EPA-EFE/RAPHAEL ALVES
By Reuters
28 May 2019 0

SAO PAULO, May 27 (Reuters) - At least 40 prisoners in Brazil were found strangled to death on Monday in four jails in the Amazon jungle city of Manaus, where a fight between rival prison gangs resulted in 15 dead the day before, authorities said.

A federal task force is being sent to Manaus in an effort to halt the violence. Prison clashes often spread rapidly in Brazil, where drug gangs have de facto control over nearly all jails.

In January 2017, nearly 150 prisoners died during three weeks of violence in north and northeastern Brazil, as local gangs backed by Brazil’s two largest drug factions – the First Capital Command and the Red Command – butchered one another.

A statement from the Amazonas state penitentiary department revised to 40 from an earlier 42 the number of deaths that took place on Monday and said authorities had regained control of the four prisons. No other details were provided.

At least 15 inmates were killed at a jail in Manaus on Sunday, with authorities saying those who died were choked and stabbed to death.

Brazil’s far-right President Jair Bolsonaro has vowed to regain control of the country’s prisons – along with building many more jails.

But the vast majority of jails are administered at the state level. For decades they have been badly overcrowded and out of control of local authorities, essentially serving as recruiting centers for drug gangs.

(Reporting by Eduardo Simoes and Brad Brooks in Sao Paulo Writing by Brad Brooks Editing by Rosalba O’Brien) DM

Gallery

Please peer review 3 community comments before your comment can be posted