Politics

iMaverick, Monday 26 September

By iMaverick Team 26 September 2011

Saudi Arabia gives women the vote; Zuma's to-do list now that he's home; In defence of Judge Lamont; and Vladimir Putin: Russia's once and future Czar. By iMAVERICK TEAM.

South Africa

YOUNG GUNS PLANNING A BUSY OCTOBER, BUT DENY POSSIBLE CLASHES

The Young Communist League has gone and organised a youth jobs summit that would more or less exactly coincide with the ANC Youth League’s much-anticipated march to everything from the Chamber of Mines to the Union Buildings. CARIEN DU PLESSIS asked the Young Reds what the plan was.

WILL IT BE HOME, SWEET, BUSY HOME FOR ZUMA?

It’s home time for President Jacob Zuma as he returned on Sunday from a week in America, where he acted globally but couldn’t stop thinking about the local politics. CARIEN DU PLESSIS looks at his long and hard to-do list, now that he’s back.

IN DEFENCE OF JUDGE LAMONT

Two weeks ago Judge Colin Lamont ruled that the “Dubula Ibhunu” (shoot the boer) songs were hate speech, and prohibited anyone from singing them. Since that day, just about everyone who doesn’t belong to Afriforum has joined together in kicking Lamont as hard as they could. And they are all right to be furious and angry. We ourselves have huge problems with this judgment. But we are all kicking the wrong target. By STEPHEN GROOTES.

SCHUBART PARK AND THE LEGAL MEASURE OF THREAT TO LIFE

On closer examination, calling Schubart Park a slum is doing a disservice to slums everywhere. But at what point does the trauma of being forced out of a hellhole you call home outweigh the clear and present dangers of staying there? The answer is very different for residents and officials – and may tell us something about our society. By PHILLIP DE WET.

Opinionistas

SIPHO HLONGWANE: ALL GOOD SOUTH AFRICANS SHOULD SUPPORT NATIONAL BRAAI DAY

Guess what I did on Heritage Day? I went to Pick ‘n Pay, bought some meat and had a braai with my friends at a house in The North. And we saw that it was good.

Africa

MASS GRAVE FOUND IN LIBYA WITH MORE THAN 1,200 BODIES

In 1996, stories began to make their way out of Libya about a mass killing in Tripoli’s Abu Salim prison. The details remained sketchy and the Libyan government initially denied that any such incident had taken place but Libyan activists in exile claimed that up to 1,200 prisoners had died. Now Libya’s interim authorities say they have found a mass grave holding the remains of more than 1,200 people. By KHADIJA PATEL.

ERITREA’S DISAPPEARED JOURNALISTS, TEN YEARS LATER

A decade ago Eritrean President Isaias Afewerki shut down his country’s independent press, and arrested 21 journalists and politicians. He’s detained many more of his citizens without trial since then. With no free media left to report on their fate, news of the prisoners has been hard to come by, but the ten-year anniversary of their disappearance has brought renewed calls by international NGOs for their release. By THERESA MALLINSON.

COTE D’IVOIRE’S ULTERIOR MOTIVE IN PRE-EMPTING LIBERIAN ELECTION VIOLENCE

In a suspicious alignment of priorities, Co?te d’Ivoire wants money to secure its western border with Liberia – to protect Liberia’s upcoming elections, apparently. But this noble plan has more to do with finishing off the pro-Gbagbo fighters causing havoc in the border area and consolidating Outtara’s own power. By SIMON ALLISON.

ZAMBIA’S NEW PRESIDENT AND HIS 90-DAY CHALLENGE

In his election campaign, Michael Sata said if he was elected president of Zambia, he could put more money in people’s pockets and that he could do so in 90 days. After a controversial election and a “thunderous and greatly enticing” inauguration, the people have put him in charge. The clock is ticking. By SIMON ALLISON.

World

TAHRIR SQUARE COMES TO WALL STREET

They call themselves “overeducated and underemployed”. They are the “Occupy Wall Street” protestors who took over New York’s financial district a week ago – and show no signs of leaving. By REBECCA DAVIS.

PLANE CRASHES NEAR THE TOP OF THE WORLD

For those of us who are never going to climb Mount Everest, a flight to view the world’s highest mountain is the next best thing. But although air passengers have a better chance of making it back alive than those who choose the climbing route, survival is by no means guaranteed, as Nepal’s dismal aviation-safety record shows. By THERESA MALLINSON.

SAUDI ARABIA GIVES WOMEN THE VOTE

In his annual address to the Shura Council, the Saudi equivalent of a parliament, King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia announced that women would be allowed to join the council. In itself, the admission of women onto the Shura is a momentous decision, but the King was not done there. He also announced that women would now be able to participate in future municipal elections – not only will they be afforded the right to vote, they are also entitled to stand for election. KHADIJA PATEL explains why this King’s speech is a huge step forward for Saudi Arabia.

SALEH’S BACK – AND HE’S NOT GOING ANYWHERE

If you’re tired of reading it, then we are definitely tired of writing it but we beg you to indulge us, dear readers. You see, Ali Abdullah Saleh, stubbornly incumbent leader of Yemen has returned to Sana’a as dogged and as remorseless as ever; he still shows no inclination to leave the business of running the country to someone else. By KHADIJA PATEL.

IT’S EVERYONE FOR THEMSELVES IN THE EUROZONE

With Europe collapsing around everyone’s ears, it isn’t helping that every country has suddenly found it within themselves to act very selfishly. Which is a bad thing, according to the IMF’s Europe head. But this is panic mode and no one is listening. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

VLADIMIR PUTIN: RUSSIA’S ONCE AND FUTURE TSAR

On Saturday President Dmitry Medvedev threw his influence and support behind Prime Minister Vladimir Putin for next president, virtually ensuring Putin will become Russia’s leader. What will Putin’s next adventure bring to the nation that likes him so much? By J BROOKS SPECTOR.

Business

UBS CEO FOLLOWS BILLIONS OUT THE DOOR

As the “rogue trader” faces court for losing billions, someone had to accept responsibility at the embattled bank. CEO Grubel eventually realised it had to be him who would drink from the poisoned chalice. By GREG NICOLSON.

NEW UBS BOSS FACES UNENVIABLE TASK OF RESCUING COMPANY IMAGE

The CEO of Swiss bank UBS Oswald Gruebel quit last week in the wake of a rogue trader scandal that cost the company over $2 billion. His interim replacement, Sergio Ermotti, faces the daunting task of repairing the bank’s reputation and internal systems that allowed one trader to lose so much money unnoticed until it was too late. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

NOKIA N9 LAUNCHED IN SOUTH AFRICA

Nokia launched the N9, its slick new smartphone in South Africa last week. Yes, the “iPhone killer” line was trotted out to explain the rationale behind this particular model. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

SAMSUNG VS APPLE, A GLOBAL-SCALE FIGHT THAT DEFIES GRAVITY AND, SOMETIMES, LOGIC

It is a really good time to be a patent lawyer. Business partners and bitter rivals Apple and Samsung are suing each other in almost every major economy in the world, whilst collaborating on other business deals. As wearying as this war is from an outsider’s perspective, there seems to be no end in sight. At least, for as long as we insist on buying expensive tablet devices and smartphones. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

Life, etc

WILL THERE BE ANOTHER DALAI LAMA?

The current Dalai Lama – the one who’s having hassles with home affairs – has been around for so long it’s easy to forget that he won’t always be here. But this weekend a meeting of top Buddhist leaders discussed plans for his succession. By REBECCA DAVIS.

FEELING BLUE? STEP INTO MY COMPUTER

Counselling via telephone was first introduced into hospitals, prisons and rural clinics decades ago. But today you don’t have to be sick or a prisoner to access therapy remotely: therapeutic sessions via Skype or email are on offer to anyone who wants it. By REBECCA DAVIS.

CATALONIA’S ‘HASTA LA VISTA’ TO BULLFIGHTING

It’s an end of an era for Catalonia. Sunday was a great day for bulls and a bad day for matadors, as the curtain fell on the final Catalonian bullfights. By REBECCA DAVIS.

STARBUCKS LEGISLATES LAPTOPIA

In December The New York Times published an article called “Destination: Laptopistan” about the trend of coffee shops being a workplace away from work. But even Laptopistan is not devoid of politics, with some coffee-shop owners becoming increasingly tetchy with customers who sit there all day making ample use of the free WiFi, without paying for it in caffeine consumption. By THERESA MALLINSON.

Sport

VICTORY FOR VETTEL IN SINGAPORE, MORE INCIDENTS FOR HAMILTON

For those who love competitive races at the front of the grid, Sebastian Vettel’s domination this season has been almost as intolerable as it has been phenomenal. The young German this weekend took one step closer to becoming the youngest ever double world champion with victory at the Singapore night race. By OSIAME MOLEFE.

ARGENTINA PIP SCOTLAND IN THRILLER

A superb late try from replacement Lucas Amorosino saw Argentina beat Scotland 13-12 on Sunday, putting one foot into the World Cup quarter-finals. By PLANETRUGBY.COM.

TOP TENNIS PLAYERS STRIKE BACK

The head of the International Tennis Federation (ITF) insists he’s not worried about threats of a strike from the leading men’s tennis players, although many top ranked players have voiced their concern and alluded to the possibility of strike action.

MARK CAVENDISH IS THE NEW KING OF THE ROAD

Only dedicated teamwork invites individual glory, as proven by the British at the World Cycling Championship, setting the scene for the Manxman’s triumph. By GREG NICOLSON.

ALL BLACKS BOSS FRANCE OFF AUCKLAND’S EDEN PARK

In a match most fans would have been salivating over since the World Cup draw was announced, New Zealand put in a comprehensive display of rugby in beating France 37-17 in Auckland. STYLI CHARALAMBOUS reviews the match.

LIVERPOOL EDGE WOLVES AT ANFIELD

Liverpool withstood a second-half Wolverhampton revival to edge a tense 2-1 victory at Anfield on Saturday afternoon. By FOOTBALL365.COM.



Photo: REUTERS

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