Politics

iMaverick, Tuesday 13 September

By iMaverick Team 13 September 2011

"Kill the Boer!" ruling: Malema's loss is also SA freedom's loss; "Biko lives"!, 34 years later; the Public Protector speaks out; and Darfur rebel leader returns home, spoiling for a fight. By iMAVERICK TEAM.

ZUMA STRETCHES HIS SILENCE ON POLICE LEASES

President Jacob Zuma won’t hazard any haphazard responses to the Public Protector’s report on controversial lease deals for police offices, which is probably why he won’t be answering MPs’ questions on this in the National Assembly on Tuesday. CARIEN DU PLESSIS reports.

‘DUBULA IBHUNU’ SUNG OUTSIDE HIGH COURT, MOMENTS AFTER IT WAS BANNED

Not 30 minutes after ANC Youth League president Julius Malema lost the right to sing ‘Dubula iBhunu’, a dozen or so of his supporters sang the song outside of the South Gauteng High Court. Only a handful of ANCYL executive committee members deigned to show face at Pritchard Street, and the man of the hour himself wasn’t there. By SIPHO HLONGWANE and MABINE SEABE.

“KILL THE BOER” RULING: MALEMA’S LOSS IS ALSO SA FREEDOM’S LOSS

Julius Malema must be wondering why nobody likes him at the moment. First he loses every application before the ANC’s national disciplinary committee, then he loses his hate-speech trial. Did he suddenly get abandoned by his mojo – the one that served him so well lately? And should we all be wondering just how much his loss will come to haunt us in future? By STEPHEN GROOTES.

THEMB’ELIHLE VS CHIAWELO: A STORY OF POWER AND THE CABLES THAT BRING IT

In Themb’elihle, residents last week violently protested their lack of (formal) electricity connections, saying being connected to the grid would save them money and give them economic opportunity. On Monday, residents of nearby Chiawelo in Soweto launched their own service-delivery protest – because while they have electricity, it has become so expensive they feel they have no choice but to steal it. BY PHILLIP DE WET.

“BIKO LIVES!”, 34 YEARS LATER

Like Che Guevera, Steve Biko is the poster child for revolution. His face adorns the T-shirts and posters of a generation who may know nothing of his teachings except that his is a face with some erstwhile significance. Thirty-four years after his death, Steve Biko is an icon but he is also a lot more than a trifling symbol of an ancient idea. KHADIJA PATEL talks to Steve Biko scholar, black consciousness thinker and organiser, co-editor of “Biko Lives!” and publisher of the journal “New Frank Talk”, Andile Mngxitama about the legacy of Steve Biko, the remaining vestiges of white privilege, the hate speech ruling against Julius Malema and most intriguingly, how often he combs his hair.

CHRISTI VAN DER WESTHUIZEN ON SA’S HIDDEN BATTLEFRONT

South Africa’s noisy debate on race rightfully rages centre stage in this society, but while we’re engaging in robust discourse about racial equality, the choice of Judge Mogoeng Mogoeng as chief justice reveals a battle on another front. MANDY DE WAAL speaks to author and political analyst Christi van der Westhuizen about power relations between men and women 17 years into SA’s democracy.

PUBLIC PROTECTOR ON PARTICIPATORY DEMOCRACY, SECRECY BILL AND HER OFFICE’S POWERS. AND THE COUNTRY IN TROUBLE

The SAPS building leases, her office’s roadshow and the protection of information bill were among the issues discussed by the Public Protector at the Cape Town Press Club. While her overriding message was that no one is above the law, she placed particular emphasis on how her office would only get busier if government did not change the way it deals with ordinary citizens. By OSIAME MOLEFE.

Opinionistas

IVO VEGTER: MALEMA’S REAL PERSECUTION

The government might as well lock me up. But at least I’ll have company. Because it might as well lock all of us up. The Julius Malema hate-speech ruling by Judge Collins Lamont sets the alarming precedent that a person’s speech, even if misunderstood, can be criminal.

KHADIJA PATEL: TOWARDS A BOUNDLESS SOUTH AFRICA

Yes, thank you, Mr President. We South Africans won’t say so, but we really are grateful for what you and the top leadership of the African National Congress did two weeks ago by announcing that fresh charges would be brought against the ANC Youth League’s top leadership.

Africa

IMF SAYS IT COULD LEND MONEY TO LIBYA AND EGYPT

We still don’t know where Muammar Gaddafi is, the dust has still not settled in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, and the International Monetary Fund is already saying that Libya and Egypt can borrow money from it if they so desire. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

RWANDAN GENOCIDE HAUNTS KAGAME’S VISIT TO FRANCE

The spectre of the genocide looms large over Rwanda’s foreign policy. Kagame’s visit to Paris is a prime example, with France accused by Rwanda of being complicit in the genocide (France denies the charges). But as France sees its influence in Kigali slipping away, Sarkozy knows he needs to build bridges, even if his generals aren’t happy. By SIMON ALLISON.

LIBYA’S WAR NO DETERRENT TO MIGRANTS HEADING FOR EUROPE

Unless you’re a war reporter or masochist, Libya’s a good place to avoid at the moment – especially if you’re black and African. The rebels will probably think you’re a Gaddafi mercenary and lock you up with a complimentary beating. But the chaos has actually encouraged many would-be African migrants, who think they can get through Libya to a better life in Europe. By SIMON ALLISON.

DARFUR REBEL LEADER RETURNS HOME FROM LIBYA, SPOILING FOR A FIGHT

The fallout from the war in Libya continues with the news that one of the most prominent rebel leaders in Darfur has returned to the troubled Sudanese region from Libya, apparently as part of a ten-vehicle convoy laden with Gaddafi gold and weapons. Khalil Ibrahim’s been out of action for a year, and his return could signal an escalation of hostilities in Darfur. By SIMON ALLISON.

World

CHIRAC, AFRICAN LEADERS AND BRIEFCASES OF CASH

Things are looking grim for French ex-president Jacques Chirac. While his corruption trial is a week underway, a former aide has come forward to claim that Chirac was given briefcases stuffed with cash by African leaders. By REBECCA DAVIS.

2,600 KILLED IN SYRIA, SAYS UN

United Nations high commissioner for human rights, Navi Pillay, said on Monday that at least 2,600 people have been killed in Syria since demonstrations against the government began in March. By KHADIJA PATEL.

Business

BOSTON GLOBE JOINS THE PAYWALL CLUB

The Boston Globe is the latest newspaper to slap up a paywall around its digital content. But will online readers bite? By THERESA MALLINSON.

YAHOO EX-BOSS OFF BOARD AFTER SLAMMING COMPANY IN INTERVIEW

Carol Bartz, the Yahoo CEO who was unexpectedly fired last week, has now equally suddenly resigned from her position on the company’s board of directors. But this news will come as no shock to anyone who read her interview in Fortune magazine last week. By REBECCA DAVIS.

SOLIDARITY ACCEPTS TELKOM WAGE OFFER

Trade union Solidarity has accepted Telkom’s 7% two-year wage offer, putting an end to a six-month negotiating period that threatened to derail more often than not. By SIPHO HLONGWANE

NEW FIBRE-OPTIC CABLE SHAVES MILLISECONDS, ADDS BILLIONS

As you read this, a Global Marine Systems undersea vessel is gingerly lowering a stretch of wire into the dark of the roiling Atlantic. It is the first fathom or so of what will eventually amount to 6,021km of fibre- optic cable, linking America with Europe, so traders can shave six milliseconds off the average speed of a transaction. Not everyone is celebrating. By RICHARD POPLAK.

Life, etc

CYNDI LAUPER FLUFFS LINE AFTER LINE OF US ANTHEM

Okay, in truth it was just one line, but we couldn’t resist that headline. On the weekend, US pop star Cyndi Lauper showed that it’s not only South Africans who have a problem remembering the words to our national anthem. By THERESA MALLINSON.

PLANET OF THE APES, 2011

If anyone had doubts about the political and even metaphysical importance of the new film, “Rise of the Planet of the Apes”, they need only turn to the writhing, bobbing and weaving among US Republican Party candidates over science to be disabused of that notion. By J BROOKS SPECTOR.

Sport

MCILROY UP TO NO. 3, BUT NOT ECSTATIC

Rory McIlroy has moved up to a career-best No. 3 on the latest World Rankings list – but the 22-year-old Irishman is a little disappointed by the way he did it. By GOLF365.COM

VETTEL TURNS THE CRITICISM INTO DUST

It’s an illustration of just how dominant Sebastian Vettel was around Monza this Sunday that he was scarcely given more than a full minute of air time. By PLANETF1.COM



Gallery

While we have your attention...

An increasingly rare commodity, quality independent journalism costs money - though not nearly as much as its absence.

Every article, every day, is our contribution to Defending Truth in South Africa. If you would like to join us on this mission, you could do much worse than support Daily Maverick's quest by becoming a Maverick Insider.

Click here to become a Maverick Insider and get a closer look at the Truth.


AmaBhungane

Corruption in the courtroom: Rhino poachers accused of bribing officials in KwaZulu-Natal

By amaBhungane

"Look for lessons about haunting when there are thousands of ghosts; when entire societies become haunted by terrible deeds that are systematically occurring and are simultaneously denied by every public organ of governance and communication." ~ Avery Gordon