The real information revolution
18 August 2017 08:56 (South Africa)

Wall Street Journal to charge for mobile access

  • Branko Brkic
    branko3048 a ray
    Branko Brkic

    Brkic is the founder and editor of The Daily Maverick.

    He has edited magazines on business and politics, technology, and wildlife. He has also published fiction and non-fiction books, most of them in Serbian. Though he has never pretended to be a reporter, his wide knowledge of politics (especially in America), combined with his experiences in a disintegrating Yugoslavia, gives him an unusual outlook on events in South Africa.

    Despite the vowel-poor surname, he tells anyone who asks that he hails from Hyde Park, Johannesburg, having spent most of his adult life in South Africa.

    Recent columns:

murdoch

As the media company after media company is forced to re-think their electronic distribution strategy, News Corp’s Rupert Murdoch is again leading the charge: Before the end of the year, mobile users will have to cough up $2 per week to access his crown jewel, The Wall Street Journal ($1 if they are already WSJ subscribers). The mobile fees are part of the Murdoch’s greater effort to introduce payment scheme for all his other electronic properties (WSJ is one of the few global brands that already charge subscription fees for online access), and that, in turn, is part of the world-wide effort by the established media companies to reverse near 20-year trend in online information being available for free. Even as he is pushing for fees, Mr Murdoch is mindful that as successful as WSJ online subscription is (with more than 1 million subscribers) it is still generating only $55 million, which is a fraction of revenues necessary to run such a gigantic media company.

  • Branko Brkic
    branko3048 a ray
    Branko Brkic

    Brkic is the founder and editor of The Daily Maverick.

    He has edited magazines on business and politics, technology, and wildlife. He has also published fiction and non-fiction books, most of them in Serbian. Though he has never pretended to be a reporter, his wide knowledge of politics (especially in America), combined with his experiences in a disintegrating Yugoslavia, gives him an unusual outlook on events in South Africa.

    Despite the vowel-poor surname, he tells anyone who asks that he hails from Hyde Park, Johannesburg, having spent most of his adult life in South Africa.

    Recent columns:

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