Maverick Life

PHOTOGRAPHY

2023 Sony World Photography Awards: Architecture and Landscape

2023 Sony World Photography Awards: Architecture and Landscape
A warning to careless drivers along the road between the northern province of Kunduz and Kabul. Central Asia was once traversed by numerous peoples, traders and armies. Afghanistan was at the heart of this world, as it welcomed those who travelled across Asia, yet arguably none of the invaders ever completely left. These images document a journey through Afghanistan after 40 years of war and four years of drought. © Bruno Zanzottera, Italy, Finalist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

The Sony World Photography Awards returns to celebrate contemporary photography and the ways the arts reflect the world around us. Here is a selection of the images from the winners of this year's national awards in the Architecture and Landscape categories.

"Muralla Roja". After a few hours of shooting, it felt like this was the best spot to take a break, so I found a chair and brought it over. The moment I placed the chair I knew this would be a great photograph. Sadly, Ricardo Bofill passed away just a few weeks after I made this image, and so this empty chair acquired a lot of symbolism. Designed by Ricardo Bofill, the Muralla Roja apartment complex is one of the most iconic pieces of Spanish architecture. Over the years I have revisited this place to photograph it again and again. On my last visit, in December 2021, my goal was to create a totally different series by capturing the Muralla Roja during the day, at sunset, at night and at sunrise. I started shooting very early in the morning and continued well into the night. I then woke early to experience an unforgettable sunrise. Sadly, Bofill passed away just a few weeks after my visit, so I consider this series to be a personal tribute to him and his legacy. © Andres Gallardo Albajar, Spain, Finalist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Muralla Roja”. After a few hours of shooting, it felt like this was the best spot to take a break, so I found a chair and brought it over. The moment I placed the chair I knew this would be a great photograph. Sadly, Ricardo Bofill passed away just a few weeks after I made this image, and so this empty chair acquired a lot of symbolism. Designed by Ricardo Bofill, the Muralla Roja apartment complex is one of the most iconic pieces of Spanish architecture. Over the years I have revisited this place to photograph it again and again. On my last visit, in December 2021, my goal was to create a totally different series by capturing the Muralla Roja during the day, at sunset, at night and at sunrise. I started shooting very early in the morning and continued well into the night. I then woke early to experience an unforgettable sunrise. Sadly, Bofill passed away just a few weeks after my visit, so I consider this series to be a personal tribute to him and his legacy. © Andres Gallardo Albajar, Spain, Finalist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Muralla Roja". As the sun was coming out and the day was taking over, I started to feel that my visit was coming to an end, but I was running high on excitement and everywhere I looked I found interesting new photographs. Designed by Ricardo Bofill, the Muralla Roja apartment complex is one of the most iconic pieces of Spanish architecture. Over the years I have revisited this place to photograph it again and again. On my last visit, in December 2021, my goal was to create a totally different series by capturing the Muralla Roja during the day, at sunset, at night and at sunrise. I started shooting very early in the morning and continued well into the night. I then woke early to experience an unforgettable sunrise. Sadly, Bofill passed away just a few weeks after my visit, so I consider this series to be a personal tribute to him and his legacy. © Andres Gallardo Albajar, Spain, Finalist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Muralla Roja”. As the sun was coming out and the day was taking over, I started to feel that my visit was coming to an end, but I was running high on excitement and everywhere I looked I found interesting new photographs. Designed by Ricardo Bofill, the Muralla Roja apartment complex is one of the most iconic pieces of Spanish architecture. Over the years I have revisited this place to photograph it again and again. On my last visit, in December 2021, my goal was to create a totally different series by capturing the Muralla Roja during the day, at sunset, at night, and at sunrise. I started shooting very early in the morning and continued well into the night. I then woke early to experience an unforgettable sunrise. Sadly, Bofill passed away just a few weeks after my visit, so I consider this series to be a personal tribute to him and his legacy. © Andres Gallardo Albajar, Spain, Finalist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

The silence was loud. These pictures represent the question of what remains of cities; what persists of our so-called civilization. The landscapes are bathed in deep blacks and burning whites, with velvety greys tracing the progress of roots and ripples in water. My background as a painter allows me to depict the textures and patterns with care. These collages become a game between analog and digital; a one-time jump that creates a surreal world and generates a gaze into a new reality that plays with perception. The viewer is led through scenes that are slow to unravel, that ask for and reward longer viewing. © Peter Franck, Germany, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

The silence was loud. These pictures represent the question of what remains of cities; what persists of our so-called civilization. The landscapes are bathed in deep blacks and burning whites, with velvety greys tracing the progress of roots and ripples in water. My background as a painter allows me to depict textures and patterns with care. These collages become a game between analog and digital; a one-time jump that creates a surreal world and generates a gaze into a new reality that plays with perception. The viewer is led through scenes that are slow to unravel, that ask for and reward longer viewing. © Peter Franck, Germany, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

The five cardinal points. These pictures represent the question of what remains of cities; what persists of our so-called civilization. The landscapes are bathed in deep blacks and burning whites, with velvety greys tracing the progress of roots and ripples in water. My background as a painter allows me to depict the textures and patterns with care. These collages become a game between analog and digital; a one-time jump that creates a surreal world and generates a gaze into a new reality that plays with perception. The viewer is led through scenes that are slow to unravel, that ask for and reward longer viewing. © Peter Franck, Germany, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

The five cardinal points. These pictures represent the question of what remains of cities; what persists of our so-called civilization. The landscapes are bathed in deep blacks and burning whites, with velvety greys tracing the progress of roots and ripples in water. My background as a painter allows me to depict textures and patterns with care. These collages become a game between analog and digital; a one-time jump that creates a surreal world and generates a gaze into a new reality that plays with perception. The viewer is led through scenes that are slow to unravel, that ask for and reward longer viewing. © Peter Franck, Germany, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Stal". Livestock shelters in fields are so common in the Belgian landscape that nobody pays them much attention, but the countryside offers a range of architectural gems in many shapes, materials and colours. For five years I criss-crossed Belgium to find just the right kind of shed, carefully listing them so I was prepared to photograph them in ‘perfect’ lighting conditions, by which I mean dense fog. The fog was necessary to isolate and valorise the construction – without it, the shed is just an extra in the landscape. As fog is unpredictable, I never knew how long it would last, and the project took several years to complete. In a way, a photograph of a weather-beaten shed is an allegory for our lives: we all muddle on, we try our best, we carry the scars and we all die horizontally in the end. Humans harbour a deep longing for shelter, warmth and security and that is perhaps what makes these wondrous little structures so human. © Servaas Van Belle, Belgium, Finalist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Stal”. Livestock shelters in fields are so common in the Belgian landscape that nobody pays them much attention, but the countryside offers a range of architectural gems in many shapes, materials and colours. For five years I criss-crossed Belgium to find just the right kind of shed, carefully listing them so I was prepared to photograph them in ‘perfect’ lighting conditions, by which I mean dense fog. The fog was necessary to isolate and valorise the construction – without it, the shed is just an extra in the landscape. As fog is unpredictable, I never knew how long it would last, and the project took several years to complete. In a way, a photograph of a weather-beaten shed is an allegory for our lives: we all muddle on, we try our best, we carry the scars and we all die horizontally in the end. Humans harbour a deep longing for shelter, warmth and security and that is perhaps what makes these wondrous little structures so human. © Servaas Van Belle, Belgium, Finalist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Stal". Livestock shelters in fields are so common in the Belgian landscape that nobody pays them much attention, but the countryside offers a range of architectural gems in many shapes, materials and colours. For five years I criss-crossed Belgium to find just the right kind of shed, carefully listing them so I was prepared to photograph them in ‘perfect’ lighting conditions, by which I mean dense fog. The fog was necessary to isolate and valorise the construction – without it, the shed is just an extra in the landscape. As fog is unpredictable, I never knew how long it would last, and the project took several years to complete. In a way, a photograph of a weather-beaten shed is an allegory for our lives: we all muddle on, we try our best, we carry the scars and we all die horizontally in the end. Humans harbour a deep longing for shelter, warmth and security and that is perhaps what makes these wondrous little structures so human. © Servaas Van Belle, Belgium, Finalist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Stal”. Livestock shelters in fields are so common in the Belgian landscape that nobody pays them much attention, but the countryside offers a range of architectural gems in many shapes, materials and colours. For five years I criss-crossed Belgium to find just the right kind of shed, carefully listing them so I was prepared to photograph them in ‘perfect’ lighting conditions, by which I mean dense fog. The fog was necessary to isolate and valorise the construction – without it, the shed is just an extra in the landscape. As fog is unpredictable, I never knew how long it would last, and the project took several years to complete. In a way, a photograph of a weather-beaten shed is an allegory for our lives: we all muddle on, we try our best, we carry the scars and we all die horizontally in the end. Humans harbour a deep longing for shelter, warmth and security and that is perhaps what makes these wondrous little structures so human. © Servaas Van Belle, Belgium, Finalist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Brutalism 01". The Torres Blancas building in Madrid, Spain, designed by Francisco Javier Sáenz de Oiza, is an example of organic and brutalist architecture. Interestingly, these design principles were applied to a block of luxury apartments instead of more affordable housing developments. This project focuses on the figuration of a singular architectural movement - brutalism. The movement can be traced back to 1950s Great Britain, a context where the demand for social housing was increasing whilst building materials were scarcely available. The resulting architectural projects placed functionality at the forefront, and gave less importance to aesthetic considerations, leading to minimal and geometric constructions designed with their practical uses in mind. Photographing brutalist structures in Spain with a pinhole camera is based on the notion that they might be viewed differently, through long exposures which produce a less defined image with blurred lines. The resulting photographs show brutalist constructions overlaid with light, creating a dreamlike effect. © Javier Arcenillas, Spain, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Brutalism 01”. The Torres Blancas building in Madrid, Spain, designed by Francisco Javier Sáenz de Oiza, is an example of organic and brutalist architecture. Interestingly, these design principles were applied to a block of luxury apartments instead of more affordable housing developments. This project focuses on the figuration of a singular architectural movement – brutalism. The movement can be traced back to 1950s Great Britain, a context where the demand for social housing was increasing whilst building materials were scarcely available. The resulting architectural projects placed functionality at the forefront, and gave less importance to aesthetic considerations, leading to minimal and geometric constructions designed with their practical uses in mind. Photographing brutalist structures in Spain with a pinhole camera is based on the notion that they might be viewed differently, through long exposures which produce a less defined image with blurred lines. The resulting photographs show brutalist constructions overlaid with light, creating a dreamlike effect. © Javier Arcenillas, Spain, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Brutalism 03". La Torre de Valencia is 94 metres high across 27 floors. It was designed for residential purposes in 1968 by the architect Javier Carvajal, and built between 1970 and 1973. This project focuses on the figuration of a singular architectural movement - brutalism. The movement can be traced back to 1950s Great Britain, a context where the demand for social housing was increasing whilst building materials were scarcely available. The resulting architectural projects placed functionality at the forefront, and gave less importance to aesthetic considerations, leading to minimal and geometric constructions designed with their practical uses in mind. Photographing brutalist structures in Spain with a pinhole camera is based on the notion that they might be viewed differently, through long exposures which produce a less defined image with blurred lines. The resulting photographs show brutalist constructions overlaid with light, creating a dreamlike effect. © Javier Arcenillas, Spain, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Brutalism 03”. La Torre de Valencia is 94 metres high across 27 floors. It was designed for residential purposes in 1968 by the architect Javier Carvajal, and built between 1970 and 1973. This project focuses on the figuration of a singular architectural movement – brutalism. The movement can be traced back to 1950s Great Britain, a context where the demand for social housing was increasing whilst building materials were scarcely available. The resulting architectural projects placed functionality at the forefront, and gave less importance to aesthetic considerations, leading to minimal and geometric constructions designed with their practical uses in mind. Photographing brutalist structures in Spain with a pinhole camera is based on the notion that they might be viewed differently, through long exposures which produce a less defined image with blurred lines. The resulting photographs show brutalist constructions overlaid with light, creating a dreamlike effect. © Javier Arcenillas, Spain, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Cement Factory". Tieshan Cement Factory is located in Guilin City in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in south China. The factory was built in 1996 and played an important role in Guilin’s economic development and urban construction. However, because it was originally located in the Li River Scenic Area of Guilin, the cement factory has now been relocated, leaving behind the old buildings, water towers, pools and railway tracks. © Fan Li, China Mainland, Finalist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Cement Factory”. Tieshan Cement Factory is located in Guilin City in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in south China. The factory was built in 1996 and played an important role in Guilin’s economic development and urban construction. However, because it was originally located in the Li River Scenic Area of Guilin, the cement factory has now been relocated, leaving behind the old buildings, water towers, pools and railway tracks. © Fan Li, China Mainland, Finalist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Cement Factory". Tieshan Cement Factory is located in Guilin City in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in south China. The factory was built in 1996 and played an important role in Guilin’s economic development and urban construction. However, because it was originally located in the Li River Scenic Area of Guilin, the cement factory has now been relocated, leaving behind the old buildings, water towers, pools and railway tracks. © Fan Li, China Mainland, Finalist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Cement Factory”. Tieshan Cement Factory is located in Guilin City in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in south China. The factory was built in 1996 and played an important role in Guilin’s economic development and urban construction. However, because it was originally located in the Li River Scenic Area of Guilin, the cement factory has now been relocated, leaving behind the old buildings, water towers, pools and railway tracks. © Fan Li, China Mainland, Finalist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Window 3". The window of a house affected by shells, taken on 16 April 2022, in Chernihiv, Ukraine. Looking out was never as dangerous as it is now. The war is felt both at home and on the streets, and windows are now glassless from the impact of missiles, bombs and gunfire. What was once a living room or a dining room is now a box from which people can see and hear the pain and desolation. In Ukraine, each window shows a horror story. These photographs were taken between March and April 2022. They reflect on how a home is now a space where devastation dwells and how its windows are now frames for the destruction outside. © Miguel Gutierrez, Venezuela, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Window 3”. The window of a house affected by shells, taken on 16 April 2022, in Chernihiv, Ukraine. Looking out was never as dangerous as it is now. The war is felt both at home and on the streets, and windows are now glassless from the impact of missiles, bombs and gunfire. What was once a living room or a dining room is now a box from which people can see and hear the pain and desolation. In Ukraine, each window shows a horror story. These photographs were taken between March and April 2022. They reflect on how a home is now a space where devastation dwells and how its windows are now frames for the destruction outside. © Miguel Gutierrez, Venezuela, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Window 5". The window of a house affected by shells, taken on 16 April 2022, in Chernihiv, Ukraine. Looking out was never as dangerous as it is now. The war is felt both at home and on the streets, and windows are now glassless from the impact of missiles, bombs and gunfire. What was once a living room or a dining room is now a box from which people can see and hear the pain and desolation. In Ukraine, each window shows a horror story. These photographs were taken between March and April 2022. They reflect on how a home is now a space where devastation dwells and how its windows are now frames for the destruction outside. © Miguel Gutierrez, Venezuela, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Window 5”. The window of a house affected by shells, taken on 16 April 2022, in Chernihiv, Ukraine. Looking out was never as dangerous as it is now. The war is felt both at home and on the streets, and windows are now glassless from the impact of missiles, bombs and gunfire. What was once a living room or a dining room is now a box from which people can see and hear the pain and desolation. In Ukraine, each window shows a horror story. These photographs were taken between March and April 2022. They reflect on how a home is now a space where devastation dwells and how its windows are now frames for the destruction outside. © Miguel Gutierrez, Venezuela, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Reed Boat". It can take between three to eight months to build a boat by hand from the reeds, but the resulting vessel can be useful for up to eight years. Totora is a giant bulrush sedge subspecies from South America. On Lake Titicaca in Peru, the indigenous Uru people use it to make boats, houses and even the floating islands upon which they live. © Johanna Marcela Garavito Morales, Colombia, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Reed Boat”. It can take between three to eight months to build a boat by hand from the reeds, but the resulting vessel can be useful for up to eight years. Totora is a giant bulrush sedge subspecies from South America. On Lake Titicaca in Peru, the indigenous Uru people use it to make boats, houses and even the floating islands upon which they live. © Johanna Marcela Garavito Morales, Colombia, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Floating House". The most remarkable thing about each house is that it is made entirely by hand. The totora is woven to make each construction resistant to the wind. Totora is a giant bulrush sedge subspecies from South America. On Lake Titicaca in Peru, the indigenous Uru people use it to make boats, houses and even the floating islands upon which they live. © Johanna Marcela Garavito Morales, Colombia, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Floating House”. The most remarkable thing about each house is that it is made entirely by hand. The totora is woven to make each construction resistant to the wind. Totora is a giant bulrush sedge subspecies from South America. On Lake Titicaca in Peru, the indigenous Uru people use it to make boats, houses and even the floating islands upon which they live. © Johanna Marcela Garavito Morales, Colombia, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Inubozaki lighthouse in Choshi, Chiba Prefecture, Japan. The Base Point is a series of photographs that considers lighthouses as ‘baseline points’. In Japan, lighthouses are said to be an evolution of the use of noroshi (smoke signals) in ancient times, when smoke was used in the daytime and signal fires were used at night to act as landmarks for ships travelling to and from Tang Dynasty-era China. The first Western-style lighthouse was built in 1869, and they became essential for safe sea travel. However, with the spread of GPS technology, many lighthouses have outlived their usefulness. There are still 64 functioning lighthouses in Japan; the lighthouses shown in this series remain in operation at their respective capes. In order to highlight the beauty of the lighthouses I took two horizontal photographs and joined them to create a larger image, before adjusting the colours and contrast. © Mitsuru Sakurai, Japan, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Inubozaki lighthouse in Choshi, Chiba Prefecture, Japan. The Base Point is a series of photographs that considers lighthouses as ‘baseline points’. In Japan, lighthouses are said to be an evolution of the use of noroshi (smoke signals) in ancient times, when smoke was used in the daytime and signal fires were used at night to act as landmarks for ships travelling to and from Tang Dynasty-era China. The first Western-style lighthouse was built in 1869, and they became essential for safe sea travel. However, with the spread of GPS technology, many lighthouses have outlived their usefulness. There are still 64 functioning lighthouses in Japan; the lighthouses shown in this series remain in operation at their respective capes. In order to highlight the beauty of the lighthouses I took two horizontal photographs and joined them to create a larger image, before adjusting the colours and contrast. © Mitsuru Sakurai, Japan, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Shonan Port lighthouse in Fujisawa, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. The Base Point The Base Point is a series of photographs that considers lighthouses as ‘baseline points’. In Japan, lighthouses are said to be an evolution of the use of noroshi (smoke signals) in ancient times, when smoke was used in the daytime and signal fires were used at night to act as landmarks for ships travelling to and from Tang Dynasty-era China. The first Western-style lighthouse was built in 1869, and they became essential for safe sea travel. However, with the spread of GPS technology, many lighthouses have outlived their usefulness. There are still 64 functioning lighthouses in Japan; the lighthouses shown in this series remain in operation at their respective capes. In order to highlight the beauty of the lighthouses I took two horizontal photographs and joined them to create a larger image, before adjusting the colours and contrast. © Mitsuru Sakurai, Japan, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Shonan Port lighthouse in Fujisawa, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. The Base Point
The Base Point is a series of photographs that considers lighthouses as ‘baseline points’. In Japan, lighthouses are said to be an evolution of the use of noroshi (smoke signals) in ancient times, when smoke was used in the daytime and signal fires were used at night to act as landmarks for ships travelling to and from Tang Dynasty-era China. The first Western-style lighthouse was built in 1869, and they became essential for safe sea travel. However, with the spread of GPS technology, many lighthouses have outlived their usefulness. There are still 64 functioning lighthouses in Japan; the lighthouses shown in this series remain in operation at their respective capes. In order to highlight the beauty of the lighthouses I took two horizontal photographs and joined them to create a larger image, before adjusting the colours and contrast. © Mitsuru Sakurai, Japan, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Late Socialism". City lecture hall (Summer theatre), Shevchenko park, Dnipro, built in 1977. Architect: Pavlo Nirinberg. This project is the result of long-term research and fieldwork. I worked alongside architect Evhenia Gubkina to find and document some of the most significant architectural projects from the late socialist period in Ukraine. The designs and constructions that emerged in this period are a postmodern reaction to the social and political changes that the country was experiencing. The colours, textures, and structural elements of these architectural projects reflect the discourses of the time, and faith in the possibility of a socialist and, at the same time, democratic development of society and Ukrainian architecture embedded in the Western European context. © Pavlo Dorohoi, Ukraine, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Late Socialism”. City lecture hall (Summer theatre), Shevchenko park, Dnipro, built in 1977. Architect: Pavlo Nirinberg. This project is the result of long-term research and fieldwork. I worked alongside architect Evhenia Gubkina to find and document some of the most significant architectural projects from the late socialist period in Ukraine. The designs and constructions that emerged in this period are a postmodern reaction to the social and political changes that the country was experiencing. The colours, textures, and structural elements of these architectural projects reflect the discourses of the time, and faith in the possibility of a socialist and, at the same time, democratic development of society and Ukrainian architecture embedded in the Western European context. © Pavlo Dorohoi, Ukraine, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Cherkasy Regional Museum of Local Lore, Cherkasy, built in 1983-1985. Architects: Leonid Kondratsky, Mykola Sobchuk, Sergiy Fursenko. This project is the result of long-term research and fieldwork. I worked alongside architect Evhenia Gubkina to find and document some of the most significant architectural projects from the late socialist period in Ukraine. The designs and constructions that emerged in this period are a postmodern reaction to the social and political changes that the country was experiencing. The colours, textures, and structural elements of these architectural projects reflect the discourses of the time, and faith in the possibility of a socialist and, at the same time, democratic development of society and Ukrainian architecture embedded in the Western European context. © Pavlo Dorohoi, Ukraine, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Cherkasy Regional Museum of Local Lore, Cherkasy, built in 1983-1985.
Architects: Leonid Kondratsky, Mykola Sobchuk, Sergiy Fursenko. This project is the result of long-term research and fieldwork. I worked alongside architect Evhenia Gubkina to find and document some of the most significant architectural projects from the late socialist period in Ukraine. The designs and constructions that emerged in this period are a postmodern reaction to the social and political changes that the country was experiencing. The colours, textures, and structural elements of these architectural projects reflect the discourses of the time, and faith in the possibility of a socialist and, at the same time, democratic development of society and Ukrainian architecture embedded in the Western European context. © Pavlo Dorohoi, Ukraine, Shortlist, Professional competition, Architecture & Design, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

A view of the Presena glacier, near Passo Del Tonale, covered with geotextile sheets to protect it from melting during the summer months. This type of covering is used in numerous ski resorts in Italy, France, Austria and Germany. On this glacier, the surface area of the sheets has increased from 20,000m² to 100,000m² in just over a decade. For a few weeks in 2021, something unusual happened to the mountains near the Tonale pass in Italy: they were covered with hundreds of metres of immaculate sheets, sparkling under the sun’s rays and reacting like sails to every gust of wind. The reason for this is an attempt is being made to save the Presena glacier on the border between Lombardy and Trentino-Alto Adige. This giant has been dying for some decades now, but to protect it from melting the slopes of this glacier are covered with geotextile sheets placed by the Pontedilegno-Tonale consortium. However, even with this protection, the melting shows no signs of subsiding, and proceeds at an ever more pressing pace. © Francesco Merlini, Italy, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

A view of the Presena glacier, near Passo Del Tonale, covered with geotextile sheets to protect it from melting during the summer months. This type of covering is used in numerous ski resorts in Italy, France, Austria and Germany. On this glacier, the surface area of the sheets has increased from 20,000m² to 100,000m² in just over a decade. For a few weeks in 2021, something unusual happened to the mountains near the Tonale pass in Italy: they were covered with hundreds of metres of immaculate sheets, sparkling under the sun’s rays and reacting like sails to every gust of wind. The reason for this is an attempt is being made to save the Presena glacier on the border between Lombardy and Trentino-Alto Adige. This giant has been dying for some decades now, but to protect it from melting the slopes of this glacier are covered with geotextile sheets placed by the Pontedilegno-Tonale consortium. However, even with this protection, the melting shows no signs of subsiding, and proceeds at an ever more pressing pace. © Francesco Merlini, Italy, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

A detail of the Presena glacier, near Passo Del Tonale, covered with geotextile sheets placed by the Pontedilegno-Tonale consortium to protect it from melting during the summer months. The sheets cover about 100,000 m² of the glacier. For a few weeks in 2021, something unusual happened to the mountains near the Tonale pass in Italy: they were covered with hundreds of metres of immaculate sheets, sparkling under the sun’s rays and reacting like sails to every gust of wind. The reason for this is an attempt is being made to save the Presena glacier on the border between Lombardy and Trentino-Alto Adige. This giant has been dying for some decades now, but to protect it from melting the slopes of this glacier are covered with geotextile sheets placed by the Pontedilegno-Tonale consortium. However, even with this protection, the melting shows no signs of subsiding, and proceeds at an ever more pressing pace. © Francesco Merlini, Italy, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

A detail of the Presena glacier, near Passo Del Tonale, covered with geotextile sheets placed by the Pontedilegno-Tonale consortium to protect it from melting during the summer months. The sheets cover about 100,000 m² of the glacier. For a few weeks in 2021, something unusual happened to the mountains near the Tonale pass in Italy: they were covered with hundreds of metres of immaculate sheets, sparkling under the sun’s rays and reacting like sails to every gust of wind. The reason for this is an attempt is being made to save the Presena glacier on the border between Lombardy and Trentino-Alto Adige. This giant has been dying for some decades now, but to protect it from melting the slopes of this glacier are covered with geotextile sheets placed by the Pontedilegno-Tonale consortium. However, even with this protection, the melting shows no signs of subsiding, and proceeds at an ever more pressing pace. © Francesco Merlini, Italy, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

The Longest Sunset. During a flight to Keflavík airport, it is possible to watch the sun set for many hours, and staying in Reykjavík during December is like living in a month-long sunset. I conceived The Longest Sunset as a psychoanalytic journey into photography. However, after I started taking photographs, I realised that what really mattered was feeling free and being able to shoot without any preconception. Therefore, the direction for these works has been guided by intuition and feeling; by having an honest approach and maintaining focus on the quiet, secret and intimate relationship between the photographer and the landscape that he has fallen into. The ancient struggle of the survival of man against nature forms the background for images that don’t try to give answers. These photographs represent natural elements that are deeply connected to the unknown. There is a surreal aspect to the composition that obscures the interpretation of the image. © Alessandro Mallamaci, Italy, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

The Longest Sunset. During a flight to Keflavík airport, it is possible to watch the sun set for many hours, and staying in Reykjavík during December is like living in a month-long sunset. I conceived The Longest Sunset as a psychoanalytic journey into photography. However, after I started taking photographs, I realised that what really mattered was feeling free and being able to shoot without any preconception. Therefore, the direction for these works has been guided by intuition and feeling; by having an honest approach and maintaining focus on the quiet, secret and intimate relationship between the photographer and the landscape that he has fallen into. The ancient struggle of the survival of man against nature forms the background for images that don’t try to give answers. These photographs represent natural elements that are deeply connected to the unknown. There is a surreal aspect to the composition that obscures the interpretation of the image. © Alessandro Mallamaci, Italy, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

The Longest Sunset. During a flight to Keflavík airport, it is possible to watch the sun set for many hours, and staying in Reykjavík during December is like living in a month-long sunset. I conceived The Longest Sunset as a psychoanalytic journey into photography. However, after I started taking photographs, I realised that what really mattered was feeling free and being able to shoot without any preconception. Therefore, the direction for these works has been guided by intuition and feeling; by having an honest approach and maintaining focus on the quiet, secret and intimate relationship between the photographer and the landscape that he has fallen into. The ancient struggle of the survival of man against nature forms the background for images that don’t try to give answers. These photographs represent natural elements that are deeply connected to the unknown. There is a surreal aspect to the composition that obscures the interpretation of the image. © Alessandro Mallamaci, Italy, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

The Longest Sunset. During a flight to Keflavík airport, it is possible to watch the sun set for many hours, and staying in Reykjavík during December is like living in a month-long sunset. I conceived The Longest Sunset as a psychoanalytic journey into photography. However, after I started taking photographs, I realised that what really mattered was feeling free and being able to shoot without any preconception. Therefore, the direction for these works has been guided by intuition and feeling; by having an honest approach and maintaining focus on the quiet, secret and intimate relationship between the photographer and the landscape that he has fallen into. The ancient struggle of the survival of man against nature forms the background for images that don’t try to give answers. These photographs represent natural elements that are deeply connected to the unknown. There is a surreal aspect to the composition that obscures the interpretation of the image. © Alessandro Mallamaci, Italy, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Sorting sun-dried red chillies on a small family farm near Guntur, Andhra Pradesh. India is the largest producer of dried red chillies in the world, accounting for 41 percent of the 4.2 million tons of global production. Foodscapes is an aerial segment of my Feed the Planet project, which is a comprehensive examination of global food supply and how the world can meet the rapidly expanding challenge of feeding humanity without putting more natural lands under the plough. With the global population expected to reach 9.7 billion by 2050, combined with a rising standard of living in rapidly developing nations, it is estimated that we will have to double the global food supply. Knowing more about how our food is produced and its environmental consequences is key to making more informed choices. This work was done with professional drones, as an elevated perspective is often the best way to show the scale required to feed all of humanity. © George Steinmetz, United States, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Sorting sun-dried red chillies on a small family farm near Guntur, Andhra Pradesh. India is the largest producer of dried red chillies in the world, accounting for 41 percent of the 4.2 million tons of global production. Foodscapes is an aerial segment of my Feed the Planet project, which is a comprehensive examination of global food supply and how the world can meet the rapidly expanding challenge of feeding humanity without putting more natural lands under the plough. With the global population expected to reach 9.7 billion by 2050, combined with a rising standard of living in rapidly developing nations, it is estimated that we will have to double the global food supply. Knowing more about how our food is produced and its environmental consequences is key to making more informed choices. This work was done with professional drones, as an elevated perspective is often the best way to show the scale required to feed all of humanity. © George Steinmetz, United States, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Organic gardening is an art form at the Château de Villandry. The original château was built in the 16th Century and sold in 1906 to Joachim Carvallo and Ann Coleman, who re-built the Renaissance garden based on classical designs. The garden today is managed by their great-great Grandson, Henri Carvallo, who lives with his family in the horse stables overlooking this horticultural masterpiece. The garden has ten full-time gardeners and attracts about 350,000 visitors per year. The central grid of nine square plots measures a little more than a hectare, with 90% planted in a rotating array of 90% seasonal vegetables, and the rest boxwood, and flowers. This picture was taken a week before the garden is harvested for their annual garden fair. The orange dots in the central square of the vegetable garden are pumpkins. Foodscapes is an aerial segment of my Feed the Planet project, which is a comprehensive examination of global food supply and how the world can meet the rapidly expanding challenge of feeding humanity without putting more natural lands under the plough. With the global population expected to reach 9.7 billion by 2050, combined with a rising standard of living in rapidly developing nations, it is estimated that we will have to double the global food supply. Knowing more about how our food is produced and its environmental consequences is key to making more informed choices. This work was done with professional drones, as an elevated perspective is often the best way to show the scale required to feed all of humanity. © George Steinmetz, United States, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Organic gardening is an art form at the Château de Villandry. The original château was built in the 16th Century and sold in 1906 to Joachim Carvallo and Ann Coleman, who re-built the Renaissance garden based on classical designs. The garden today is managed by their great-great Grandson, Henri Carvallo, who lives with his family in the horse stables overlooking this horticultural masterpiece. The garden has ten full-time gardeners and attracts about 350,000 visitors per year. The central grid of nine square plots measures a little more than a hectare, with 90% planted in a rotating array of 90% seasonal vegetables, and the rest boxwood, and flowers. This picture was taken a week before the garden is harvested for their annual garden fair. The orange dots in the central square of the vegetable garden are pumpkins. Foodscapes is an aerial segment of my Feed the Planet project, which is a comprehensive examination of global food supply and how the world can meet the rapidly expanding challenge of feeding humanity without putting more natural lands under the plough. With the global population expected to reach 9.7 billion by 2050, combined with a rising standard of living in rapidly developing nations, it is estimated that we will have to double the global food supply. Knowing more about how our food is produced and its environmental consequences is key to making more informed choices. This work was done with professional drones, as an elevated perspective is often the best way to show the scale required to feed all of humanity. © George Steinmetz, United States, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Woodland Kids". From a height of around 100 metres (330 feet), a frozen lake reveals fox tracks, streaks of fresh snow and dark structures of wet ice; the holes and bush-like forms are caused by methane bubbling up. I didn’t know what I would see when I was flying – I allowed instinct to take over, like a bird taking off from its nest. At the start of winter I set out on a journey in search of harmony. Driven by instinct, I ventured further and further until I passed the boundaries of rationality. Whether it was fog or snow, frost or thaw, I took to the sky to see if it was possible to fly. When I could, I flew over frozen bodies of water, fascinated by their icy forms. Between January and March I made 76 solo flights in a gyrocopter or a motorised paraglider, covering around 10,000 kilometres (6,200 miles) and spending 200 hours in the air. My photographs were taken from a height of approximately 50-150 metres (165-495 feet) above bodies of water near Tricity in northern Poland. © Kacper Kowalski, Poland, Finalist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Woodland Kids”. From a height of around 100 metres (330 feet), a frozen lake reveals fox tracks, streaks of fresh snow and dark structures of wet ice; the holes and bush-like forms are caused by methane bubbling up.
I didn’t know what I would see when I was flying – I allowed instinct to take over, like a bird taking off from its nest. At the start of winter I set out on a journey in search of harmony. Driven by instinct, I ventured further and further until I passed the boundaries of rationality. Whether it was fog or snow, frost or thaw, I took to the sky to see if it was possible to fly. When I could, I flew over frozen bodies of water, fascinated by their icy forms. Between January and March I made 76 solo flights in a gyrocopter or a motorised paraglider, covering around 10,000 kilometres (6,200 miles) and spending 200 hours in the air. My photographs were taken from a height of approximately 50-150 metres (165-495 feet) above bodies of water near Tricity in northern Poland. © Kacper Kowalski, Poland, Finalist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"The Sound of the Night". The surface of old ice on a lake in northern Poland. Sometimes my dog hears the sounds of the forest, pricks up his ears and feels nature’s call. I wonder how much of the wild wolf remains in him. And then I look in the mirror and wonder how much of the natural wildness remains in people? At the start of winter I set out on a journey in search of harmony. Driven by instinct, I ventured further and further until I passed the boundaries of rationality. Whether it was fog or snow, frost or thaw, I took to the sky to see if it was possible to fly. When I could, I flew over frozen bodies of water, fascinated by their icy forms. Between January and March I made 76 solo flights in a gyrocopter or a motorised paraglider, covering around 10,000 kilometres (6,200 miles) and spending 200 hours in the air. My photographs were taken from a height of approximately 50-150 metres (165-495 feet) above bodies of water near Tricity in northern Poland. © Kacper Kowalski, Poland, Finalist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“The Sound of the Night”. The surface of old ice on a lake in northern Poland.
Sometimes my dog hears the sounds of the forest, pricks up his ears and feels nature’s call. I wonder how much of the wild wolf remains in him. And then I look in the mirror and wonder how much of the natural wildness remains in people? At the start of winter I set out on a journey in search of harmony. Driven by instinct, I ventured further and further until I passed the boundaries of rationality. Whether it was fog or snow, frost or thaw, I took to the sky to see if it was possible to fly. When I could, I flew over frozen bodies of water, fascinated by their icy forms. Between January and March I made 76 solo flights in a gyrocopter or a motorised paraglider, covering around 10,000 kilometres (6,200 miles) and spending 200 hours in the air. My photographs were taken from a height of approximately 50-150 metres (165-495 feet) above bodies of water near Tricity in northern Poland. © Kacper Kowalski, Poland, Finalist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Two young tourists from Kabul take a selfie during a boat trip on Lake Bandi Amir in Bamyan province. Because of the very long war, for many people this is the first time they have been able to travel outside their city. Central Asia was once traversed by numerous peoples, traders and armies. Afghanistan was at the heart of this world, as it welcomed those who travelled across Asia, yet arguably none of the invaders ever completely left. These images document a journey through Afghanistan after 40 years of war and four years of drought. © Bruno Zanzottera, Italy, Finalist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Two young tourists from Kabul take a selfie during a boat trip on Lake Bandi Amir in Bamyan province. Because of the very long war, for many people, this is the first time they have been able to travel outside their city. Central Asia was once traversed by numerous peoples, traders and armies. Afghanistan was at the heart of this world, as it welcomed those who travelled across Asia, yet arguably none of the invaders ever completely left. These images document a journey through Afghanistan after 40 years of war and four years of drought.
© Bruno Zanzottera, Italy, Finalist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

A tukul – a typical house in South Sudan – in floodwaters near Mayendit, Unity state, South Sudan. Unprecedented flooding has submerged large swathes of the country and displaced hundreds of thousands of people. In the villages, most of the houses are built with straw wood and plastic sheeting, which has further aggravated the consequences of the floods. South Sudan has been plagued by political violence and instability since its independence from Sudan in 2011. Now it is experiencing massive floods for the fourth consecutive year. Since 2019, unprecedented rainy seasons have submerged large parts of the country’s landscape. Heavy rains and floods have swept away people’s homes, properties, crops, livestock, schools and healthcare centres, and caused extensive infrastructural damage to roads and bridges. The climate crisis is bringing further challenges to this already vulnerable country. © Fabio Bucciarelli, Italy, Finalist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

A tukul – a typical house in South Sudan – in floodwaters near Mayendit, Unity state, South Sudan. Unprecedented flooding has submerged large swathes of the country and displaced hundreds of thousands of people. In the villages, most of the houses are built with straw wood and plastic sheeting, which has further aggravated the consequences of the floods. South Sudan has been plagued by political violence and instability since its independence from Sudan in 2011. Now it is experiencing massive floods for the fourth consecutive year. Since 2019, unprecedented rainy seasons have submerged large parts of the country’s landscape. Heavy rains and floods have swept away people’s homes, properties, crops, livestock, schools and healthcare centres, and caused extensive infrastructural damage to roads and bridges. The climate crisis is bringing further challenges to this already vulnerable country. © Fabio Bucciarelli, Italy, Finalist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

A car submerged by floodwaters in Mayendit, Unity state, South Sudan. Mayendit is one of the many villages disappearing under water. In 2020 more than 12,000 people were living there, but in the last two years around ⅔ of them have left, becoming internally displaced persons. South Sudan has been plagued by political violence and instability since its independence from Sudan in 2011. Now it is experiencing massive floods for the fourth consecutive year. Since 2019, unprecedented rainy seasons have submerged large parts of the country’s landscape. Heavy rains and floods have swept away people’s homes, properties, crops, livestock, schools and healthcare centres, and caused extensive infrastructural damage to roads and bridges. The climate crisis is bringing further challenges to this already vulnerable country. © Fabio Bucciarelli, Italy, Finalist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

A car submerged by floodwaters in Mayendit, Unity state, South Sudan. Mayendit is one of the many villages disappearing under water. In 2020 more than 12,000 people were living there, but in the last two years around ⅔ of them have left, becoming internally displaced persons. South Sudan has been plagued by political violence and instability since its independence from Sudan in 2011. Now it is experiencing massive floods for the fourth consecutive year. Since 2019, unprecedented rainy seasons have submerged large parts of the country’s landscape. Heavy rains and floods have swept away people’s homes, properties, crops, livestock, schools and healthcare centres, and caused extensive infrastructural damage to roads and bridges. The climate crisis is bringing further challenges to this already vulnerable country. © Fabio Bucciarelli, Italy, Finalist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

First light. Algerian Sahara, 2022. Eight thousand years ago, a shift in the tilt of Earth’s axis transformed a green and fertile land supporting human, animal and plant life into a mineral landscape of dust, rock and sand. Ghosts of the Green Sahara examines the traces of this once-green land through the geological, geographical and historical phenomena that remain in the Sahara Desert today. © Nicholas Holt, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

First light. Algerian Sahara, 2022. Eight thousand years ago, a shift in the tilt of the Earth’s axis transformed a green and fertile land supporting human, animal and plant life into a mineral landscape of dust, rock and sand. Ghosts of the Green Sahara examines the traces of this once-green land through the geological, geographical and historical phenomena that remain in the Sahara Desert today. © Nicholas Holt, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Dust cloud. Algerian Sahara, 2022. Eight thousand years ago, a shift in the tilt of Earth’s axis transformed a green and fertile land supporting human, animal and plant life into a mineral landscape of dust, rock and sand. Ghosts of the Green Sahara examines the traces of this once-green land through the geological, geographical and historical phenomena that remain in the Sahara Desert today. © Nicholas Holt, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

Dust cloud. Algerian Sahara, 2022. Eight thousand years ago, a shift in the tilt of the Earth’s axis transformed a green and fertile land supporting human, animal and plant life into a mineral landscape of dust, rock and sand. Ghosts of the Green Sahara examines the traces of this once-green land through the geological, geographical and historical phenomena that remain in the Sahara Desert today. © Nicholas Holt, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"A pure spirit grows beneath the bark of stones / Devonian Forests / Catskill Fossil Forests". Archaeopteris hibernica fronds, Catskill Delta Complex. Paleobotany Collection, New York State Museum, Albany NY. Like the eponymous verse of Gérard de Nerval’s poem, A Pure Spirit Grows Beneath the Bark of Stones celebrates an ontological pluralism in its effort to recognise a form of sensitivity and subjectivity in forest natural entities. This series echoes two bodies of images: One testifies to the ancestral memory of primordial forests. Like original photographic prints, the fossils of the oldest forests on Earth found in the Middle Devonian Catskills (dating back 385 million years) embody the memory of these first forests through the phenomena of long and silent transmutations of plant into mineral. The other reveals the vibrant spectrum of contemporary forests; the survival of an archaic spirit that manifests itself at the heart of the present forests. © Amélie Labourdette, France, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“A pure spirit grows beneath the bark of stones / Devonian Forests / Catskill Fossil Forests”. Archaeopteris hibernica fronds, Catskill Delta Complex. Paleobotany Collection, New York State Museum, Albany NY. Like the eponymous verse of Gérard de Nerval’s poem, A Pure Spirit Grows Beneath the Bark of Stones celebrates an ontological pluralism in its effort to recognise a form of sensitivity and subjectivity in forest natural entities. This series echoes two bodies of images: One testifies to the ancestral memory of primordial forests. Like original photographic prints, the fossils of the oldest forests on Earth found in the Middle Devonian Catskills (dating back 385 million years) embody the memory of these first forests through the phenomena of long and silent transmutations of plant into mineral. The other reveals the vibrant spectrum of contemporary forests; the survival of an archaic spirit that manifests itself at the heart of the present forests. © Amélie Labourdette, France, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"A pure spirit grows beneath the bark of stones / Contemporary forests / The spirit of the forest". Mossy forest. Communal forest of Noidant-le-Rocheux, Haute-Marne, France. Like the eponymous verse of Gérard de Nerval’s poem, A Pure Spirit Grows Beneath the Bark of Stones celebrates an ontological pluralism in its effort to recognise a form of sensitivity and subjectivity in forest natural entities. This series echoes two bodies of images: One testifies to the ancestral memory of primordial forests. Like original photographic prints, the fossils of the oldest forests on Earth found in the Middle Devonian Catskills (dating back 385 million years) embody the memory of these first forests through the phenomena of long and silent transmutations of plant into mineral. The other reveals the vibrant spectrum of contemporary forests; the survival of an archaic spirit that manifests itself at the heart of the present forests. © Amélie Labourdette, France, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“A pure spirit grows beneath the bark of stones / Contemporary forests / The spirit of the forest”. Mossy forest. Communal forest of Noidant-le-Rocheux, Haute-Marne, France. Like the eponymous verse of Gérard de Nerval’s poem, A Pure Spirit Grows Beneath the Bark of Stones celebrates an ontological pluralism in its effort to recognise a form of sensitivity and subjectivity in forest natural entities. This series echoes two bodies of images: One testifies to the ancestral memory of primordial forests. Like original photographic prints, the fossils of the oldest forests on Earth found in the Middle Devonian Catskills (dating back 385 million years) embody the memory of these first forests through the phenomena of long and silent transmutations of plant into mineral. The other reveals the vibrant spectrum of contemporary forests; the survival of an archaic spirit that manifests itself at the heart of the present forests. © Amélie Labourdette, France, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

A soccer field in Las Manchas, buried by ash. La Palma, Spain, 21 January 2022. This volcanic eruption on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands started on 19 September 2021 and lasted for 85 days, destroying thousands of homes and displacing more than 10,000 people in the process. It also covered large areas with ash, which now accumulates everywhere. One of the areas most affected by the ash was the town of Las Manchas, where several meters of ash completely buried many homes. For an assignment I documented the reality of the island and the transformation of its territory one month after the end of the volcano’s eruption. © Cesar Dezfuli, Spain, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

A soccer field in Las Manchas, buried by ash. La Palma, Spain, 21 January 2022. This volcanic eruption on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands started on 19 September 2021 and lasted for 85 days, destroying thousands of homes and displacing more than 10,000 people in the process. It also covered large areas with ash, which now accumulates everywhere. One of the areas most affected by the ash was the town of Las Manchas, where several meters of ash completely buried many homes. For an assignment I documented the reality of the island and the transformation of its territory one month after the end of the volcano’s eruption. © Cesar Dezfuli, Spain, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

An aerial view of the lava flows from the volcano. La Palma, Spain, 22 January 2022. This volcanic eruption on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands started on 19 September 2021 and lasted for 85 days, destroying thousands of homes and displacing more than 10,000 people in the process. It also covered large areas with ash, which now accumulates everywhere. One of the areas most affected by the ash was the town of Las Manchas, where several meters of ash completely buried many homes. For an assignment I documented the reality of the island and the transformation of its territory one month after the end of the volcano’s eruption. © Cesar Dezfuli, Spain, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

An aerial view of the lava flows from the volcano. La Palma, Spain, 22 January 2022. This volcanic eruption on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands started on 19 September 2021 and lasted for 85 days, destroying thousands of homes and displacing more than 10,000 people in the process. It also covered large areas with ash, which now accumulates everywhere. One of the areas most affected by the ash was the town of Las Manchas, where several meters of ash completely buried many homes. For an assignment, I documented the reality of the island and the transformation of its territory one month after the end of the volcano’s eruption. © Cesar Dezfuli, Spain, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Burned Landscape". The burned area in the fire that devastated more than 10,500 hectares in the region of Valdeorras, Galicia, northwestern Spain. This fire is considered the most important in the history of the province of Ourense and the second in Galicia. Between 2012 and 2022 the number of large wildfires in Spain, where 500 hectares or more have been burned, has increased by more than 10 percent compared to the previous decade. Devouring everything in their path, these are extreme events that are impossible for firefighting teams to deal with. The scientific community links them directly to climate change and qualifies them as sixth generation fires. The risk is great, with catastrophic damage to the landscape, the economy and the lives of the population. This series of aerial images shows the consequences of the forest fires in Spain in the summer of 2022. © Brais Lorenzo Couto, Spain, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Burned Landscape”. The burned area in the fire that devastated more than 10,500 hectares in the region of Valdeorras, Galicia, northwestern Spain. This fire is considered the most important in the history of the province of Ourense and the second in Galicia. Between 2012 and 2022 the number of large wildfires in Spain, where 500 hectares or more have been burned, has increased by more than 10 percent compared to the previous decade. Devouring everything in their path, these are extreme events that are impossible for firefighting teams to deal with. The scientific community links them directly to climate change and qualifies them as sixth-generation fires. The risk is great, with catastrophic damage to the landscape, the economy and the lives of the population. This series of aerial images shows the consequences of the forest fires in Spain in the summer of 2022. © Brais Lorenzo Couto, Spain, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

"Burned Landscape". A view of the cemetery in the town of Otero de Bodas in Zamora. In 2022, the region experienced one of the most devastating forest fires in the history of Spain, when 28,046 hectares burned in Sierra de la Culebra. Between 2012 and 2022 the number of large wildfires in Spain, where 500 hectares or more have been burned, has increased by more than 10 percent compared to the previous decade. Devouring everything in their path, these are extreme events that are impossible for firefighting teams to deal with. The scientific community links them directly to climate change and qualifies them as sixth generation fires. The risk is great, with catastrophic damage to the landscape, the economy and the lives of the population. This series of aerial images shows the consequences of the forest fires in Spain in the summer of 2022. © Brais Lorenzo Couto, Spain, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

“Burned Landscape”. A view of the cemetery in the town of Otero de Bodas in Zamora. In 2022, the region experienced one of the most devastating forest fires in the history of Spain, when 28,046 hectares burned in Sierra de la Culebra. Between 2012 and 2022 the number of large wildfires in Spain, where 500 hectares or more have been burned, has increased by more than 10 percent compared to the previous decade. Devouring everything in their path, these are extreme events that are impossible for firefighting teams to deal with. The scientific community links them directly to climate change and qualifies them as sixth-generation fires. The risk is great, with catastrophic damage to the landscape, the economy and the lives of the population. This series of aerial images shows the consequences of the forest fires in Spain in the summer of 2022. © Brais Lorenzo Couto, Spain, Shortlist, Professional competition, Landscape, Sony World Photography Awards 2023

DM/ML

Gallery

Comments - Please in order to comment.

Please peer review 3 community comments before your comment can be posted

A South African Hero: You

There’s a 99.7% chance that this isn’t for you. Only 0.3% of our readers have responded to this call for action.

Those 0.3% of our readers are our hidden heroes, who are fuelling our work and impacting the lives of every South African in doing so. They’re the people who contribute to keep Daily Maverick free for all, including you.

The equation is quite simple: the more members we have, the more reporting and investigations we can do, and the greater the impact on the country.

Be part of that 0.3%. Be a Maverick. Be a Maverick Insider.

Support Daily Maverick→
Payment options

MavericKids vol 3

How can a child learn to read if they don't have a book?

81% of South African children aged 10 can't read for meaning. You can help by pre-ordering a copy of MavericKids.

For every copy sold we will donate a copy to Gift of The Givers for children in need of reading support.