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U.S. Space Force holds war game to test satellite netwo...

Newsdeck

Space Force exercises

U.S. Space Force holds war game to test satellite network under attack

epaselect epa09600034 A handout picture made available by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) shows the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launching, with the Double Asteroid Redirection Test, or DART, spacecraft onboard, from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California, USA, 23 November 2021. DART is the world?s first full-scale planetary defense test, demonstrating one method of asteroid deflection technology. The mission was built and is managed by Johns Hopkins APL for NASA's Planetary Defense Coordination Office. EPA-EFE/Bill Ingalls / HANDOUT MANDATORY CREDIT: (NASA/Bill Ingalls) HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY/NO SALES
By Reuters
14 Dec 2021 0

PETERSON SPACE FORCE BASE, Colo., Dec 13 (Reuters) - The United States is testing satellite resiliency to threats from China and Russia miles above the earth's surface, just weeks after Russia shot down an aging communications satellite.

By Mike Stone

 

The computer-aided simulations included potential shooting down of U.S. missile-tracking satellites, satellite jamming, and other electronic warfare “effects” that are possible tactics in space warfare. Actual satellites are not used.

During a visit to Schriever Space Force Base in Colorado, Deputy Secretary of Defense Kathleen Hicks saw the ‘Space Flag’ simulated space training exercise hosted by U.S. forces. It was the 13th such exercise, and the third to involve partners such as Britain, Canada and Australia.

“It happens in rooms like that … people at a relatively junior level in many cases. Collaborating and thinking through challenges and trying to figure out concepts that seem to make sense and discarding ideas that go astray,” Hicks told reporters en route to Hawaii.

Pentagon leaders are touring U.S. bases this week while the Biden administration’s draft 2023 budget takes shape. The Department of Defense hopes to move budget dollars toward a military that can deter China and Russia.

After Russia successfully conducted https://www.reuters.com/world/us-military-reports-debris-generating-event-outer-space-2021-11-15 an anti-satellite missile test last month, U.S. officials believe there is an increasing need to make the U.S. satellite network resilient to attack and to use opportunities like ‘Space Flag’ to train.

Satellites are vital to military communications, global positioning navigation, and timing systems that are needed in the event of war.

The 10-day-long space war game attempts to simulate the cutting edge of the U.S. capability in space. The training exercise involved an adversarial group working to simulate an aggressor nation with space capabilities like Russia or China.

Russia is not the first country to conduct anti-satellite tests in space. The United States performed the first in 1959, when satellites were rare and new.

In Hawaii, Hicks will meet with Pacific military commanders and visit Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam where she will hear about water contamination issues. (Reporting by Mike Stone at Peterson Space Force Base in Colorado, Editing by Rosalba O’Brien and Richard Pullin)

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