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Brazil now planning a daylight Olympics?

Defend Truth

Brazil now planning a daylight Olympics?

The chaos during a power failure that brought darkness to some 60 million people in Brazil has prompted security fears and an embarrassment for the country getting ready to host the 2016 Olympics and the 2014 Soccer World Cup final. Paraguay was totally dark for about 30 minutes. Power disappeared for more than two hours in Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo and other major cities when transmission difficulties sent one of the biggest hydroelectric dams in the world offline. Muggers robbed people en masse near Rio's Maracana Stadium – the venue for the opening and closing Olympic ceremonies, though police said that overall crime did not rise. Brazilian authorities said storms brought down power lines and towers, causing a domino effect that rippled across the region. For more, read the AP

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