South Africa

PRE-PRISON DIARIES

Midnight deadline: Visuals from Nkandla in the tense build-up to Jacob Zuma’s imprisonment

Former president Jacob Zuma addresses hundreds of supporters from a stage outside his Nkandla homestead on Sunday 4 July 2021. (Photo: Leila Dougan)

After an intense buildup and standoff throughout Wednesday – and the week – former president Jacob Zuma’s motorcade sped out of his Nkandla homestead at about 11.20pm, rushing to hand himself over in order to avoid arrest. On Tuesday last week, the Constitutional Court set a 7 July midnight deadline for his arrest if he did hot hand himself over to begin his 15-month jail term after being found guilty of contempt of court.

An escort of black official vehicles leaves former president Jacob Zuma’s Nkandla homestead on Wednesday, 7 July 2021.  (Photo: Leila Dougan)

See the story here: Jacob Zuma speeds out of Nkandla and into custody at Estcourt Correctional Centre

A police motorcade is seen 5km from former president Jacob Zuma’s Nkandla homestead half an hour after he was taken to the Estcourt Correctional Centre in KwaZulu-Natal to start serving a 15-month jail sentence. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
The police motorcade 5km from Jacob Zuma’s Nkandla homestead half an hour after he was taken to the Estcourt Correctional Centre. (Photo: Leila Dougan)

Read the Reaction  here: Eleventh Hour: South Africa reacts with relief after Jacob Zuma taken to into police custody, ANC calls for calm

An escort of black official vehicles leaves former president Jacob Zuma’s Nkandla homestead on Wednesday, 7 July 2021. According to the Department of Correctional Services, Zuma was admitted to start serving a 15-month sentence at the Estcourt Correctional Centre. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
A Daymed ambulance, which arrived at Jacob Zuma’s Nkandla homestead, is obstructed by Zuma supporters. Shortly after, Zuma’s son Edward told supporters the ambulance was not there for the former president and the emergency vehicles were let through. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
Jacob Zuma supporters block the Daymed ambulance as it arrives at the former president’s homestead in Nkandla. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
Former president Jacob Zuma’s son, Edward, outside the Nkandla residence on Wednesday, 7 July 2021. Edward said repeatedly that he was prepared to die for his father and would not allow him to be taken to jail. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
A handful of Jacob Zuma supporters outside his homestead in Nkandla on Wednesday, 7 July 2021. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
Convoys drove in and out of Jacob Zuma’s Nkandla compound throughout Wednesday. The former president was ordered by the Constitutional Court to report to the police by Sunday to start a 15-month prison sentence after he was found guilty of contempt of court. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
Suspended ANC member Carl Niehaus speaks to journalists outside Jacob Zuma’s homestead. According to reports, Niehaus’s membership has temporarily been suspended for the ‘inflammatory speeches’ he made outside Nkandla over the weekend. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
Journalists outside former president Jacob Zuma’s Nkandla residence on Wednesday, 7 July 2021. Zuma was ordered by the Constitutional Court to report to the police by Sunday to start his 15-month sentence. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
Members of the Umkhonto weSizwe Military Veterans Association stand guard outside Jacob Zuma’s Nkandla residence in KwaZulu-Natal-Natal on Wednesday, 7 July 2021. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
A general view outside former president Jacob Zuma’s Nkandla residence on Wednesday, 7 July 2021. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
Former president Jacob Zuma’s son, Edward, outside his father’s homestead in KwaZulu-Natal on Wednesday, 7 July 2020.
Hundreds of Jacob Zuma supporters listen to him speak at Nkandla on Sunday, 4 July 2021. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
Former president Jacob Zuma makes a brief appearance outside his Nkandla homestead on Saturday, 3 July 2021, flanked by bodyguards, AmaButho and supporters and Umkhonto weSizwe Military Veterans Association members. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
Human Settlements Minister Lindiwe Sisulu outside the homestead of former president Jacob Zuma in Nkandla on Sunday, 4 July 2021. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
Suspended ANC Secretary-General Ace Magashule outside Jacob Zuma’s Nkandla homestead on Saturday, 3 July 2021. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
Supporters of former president Jacob Zuma outside his Nkandla homestead on Friday, 2 July 2021. (Photo: Leila Dougan)

 

A general view of former president Jacob Zuma’s Nkandla homestead on Friday, 2 July 2021. (Photo: Leila Dougan)
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All Comments 4

  • Okay, so I have questions.
    1) Now that JZ is in jail, surely we need to bring an application to have his “presidential benefits” removed? You know, being a criminal etc.? How do we do this?
    2) Surely Edward “thick as mud” Zuma can be charged with clearly breaking lockdown regulations, but also a host of calls for violence etc. (unless he’s died and is in a ditch, then we can throw a party)
    3) Who funded all those posters and the like? Surely it’s easy to track backwards, and charge them with organising multiple lockdown violations.
    4) All those non-mask wearing people, clearly the C19 numbers will be going up, who can be charged with inciting this behaviour?

    There’s a real cost to this, and as always it’s us the taxpayers paying. At some point how do we get accountability for these buffoons acting like rules do not exist. I’ll settle for point 1, but others would be a bonus.

    • “1) Now that JZ is in jail, surely we need to bring an application to have his “presidential benefits” removed? You know, being a criminal etc.? How do we do this?”
      I so agree but I fear we have more chance of being bitten by a daffodil

    • Unfortunately the only time presidential benefits can be removed, is if he’s been impeached as a sitting president.
      That law has to change!
      So in the interim we pay his benefits and his free meals in prison.