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21 July 2017 02:56 (South Africa)
Sport

Football and Society: Gabon’s Aubumeyang responds to Toure and Ayew

  • Ismail Lagardien
    Dr-Ismail-Lagardien.jpg
    Ismail Lagardien

    Ismail Lagardien is the Executive Dean of Business and Economics Sciences at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. He is sure people are wise enough to work out that the views expressed in this space do not represent those of his employers. Also, he writes at around midnight so he can focus on his day job – which is the greatest job anyone can wish for…. 

    Other than aspiring, always, to write as well as Tolstoy, he has an active and engaged interest in the global political economy, global finance, and in capitalism – especially the neo-classical economics basis and liberal orthodoxy that provides the intellectual and political basis for late capitalism.

    He was, once, an average journalist and a rubbish photographer. He was overpaid and under-employed in the office of Joseph Stiglitz, when the latter was Chief Economist of the World Bank. He made a small contribution to the National Development Plan.

    He has no religious or spiritual beliefs, does not care for identity politics – especially not religion, ethnicity and race - and is just pleased, every morning, that he has another day. In particular, he believes that bad people have the capacity to be good, and good people the capacity to be bad. 

    To paraphrase his favourite director, Andrei Tarkovsky he believes that we write because we are tormented, because we have doubt, because we are constantly in need to prove ourselves and that we are worthy of something.

    He was born in Fietas, Johannesburg, grew up in Grahamstown and Eldorado Park, and studied at the London School of Economics and at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth.

  • Sport
Photo: Borussia Dortmund's Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang celebrates with Matthias Ginter (R) after scoring a second goal against Darmstadt 98 during the Bundesliga first division soccer match in Dortmund, Germany September 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ina Fassbender

African footballer of the year, Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang, responds to criticisms by Yaya Toure and Andre Ayew. Aubumeyang described comments by Toure and Ayew as hurtful and shameful. By ISMAIL LAGARDIEN.

The winner of this years African Player of the year award, Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang, of Gabon, has spoken out against the absurd criticisms by the Ivory Coast player, Yaya Toure and Ghana’s Andre Ayew.

Aubameyang, a striker for Borussia Dortmund, in Germany, said he was hurt after Toure said it was “indecent” to give the Gabon forward the African Player of the Year award. When it was announced that Aubameyang had won the 2016 award, Toure who plays for Manchester City in England, said the decision had brought “shame” on the continent, while Swansea's Ayew also questioned the move. Initially, Aubumenyang said he was not interested in Toure’s criticism, but upon reflection told the BBC Sport that he was hurt and disappointed.

I was hurt by what was said…. It's a shame…. "The award is based on the whole year and not just the African Cup of Nations," added Aubameyang, who is currently the leading scorer in the Bundesliga with 18 goals.

In a vote of coaches and technical directors of Confederation of African Football (CAF) nations, Aubameyang got 143 points, with Toure on 136 and Swansea midfielder Ayew on 112. Toure, BBC African footballer of the year for 2015, had won the CAF award in each of the previous four years. Toure (Ivory Coast) and Ayew (Ghana) reached the African Cup of Nations final, and Gabon went out early.

See short video of interview with Aubumeyang.

The Borussia Dortmund striker, who is a target for Barcelona, has been at the heart of his club's revival, this season. Aubameyang is currently the top scorer in the German Bundesliga, with 18 goals; above Robert Lewandowski and Thomas Müller of Bayern Munich. DM

Photo: Borussia Dortmund's Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang celebrates with Matthias Ginter (R) after scoring a second goal against Darmstadt 98 during the Bundesliga first division soccer match in Dortmund, Germany September 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ina Fassbender

  • Ismail Lagardien
    Dr-Ismail-Lagardien.jpg
    Ismail Lagardien

    Ismail Lagardien is the Executive Dean of Business and Economics Sciences at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. He is sure people are wise enough to work out that the views expressed in this space do not represent those of his employers. Also, he writes at around midnight so he can focus on his day job – which is the greatest job anyone can wish for…. 

    Other than aspiring, always, to write as well as Tolstoy, he has an active and engaged interest in the global political economy, global finance, and in capitalism – especially the neo-classical economics basis and liberal orthodoxy that provides the intellectual and political basis for late capitalism.

    He was, once, an average journalist and a rubbish photographer. He was overpaid and under-employed in the office of Joseph Stiglitz, when the latter was Chief Economist of the World Bank. He made a small contribution to the National Development Plan.

    He has no religious or spiritual beliefs, does not care for identity politics – especially not religion, ethnicity and race - and is just pleased, every morning, that he has another day. In particular, he believes that bad people have the capacity to be good, and good people the capacity to be bad. 

    To paraphrase his favourite director, Andrei Tarkovsky he believes that we write because we are tormented, because we have doubt, because we are constantly in need to prove ourselves and that we are worthy of something.

    He was born in Fietas, Johannesburg, grew up in Grahamstown and Eldorado Park, and studied at the London School of Economics and at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth.

  • Sport

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