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Pope used vulgar Italian word to refer to LGBT people, Italian newspapers report

Pope used vulgar Italian word to refer to LGBT people, Italian newspapers report
The cape covers the face of Pope Francis as he leads the weekly general audience in Saint Peter's Square, Vatican City, 10 April 2024. EPA-EFE/ETTORE FERRARI

VATICAN CITY, May 27 (Reuters) - Pope Francis used a highly derogatory term towards the LGBT community as he reiterated in a closed-door meeting with Italian bishops that gay people should not be allowed to become priests, Italian media reported on Monday.

La Repubblica and Corriere della Sera, Italy’s largest circulation dailies, both quoted the pope as saying seminaries, or priesthood colleges, are already too full of “frociaggine”, a vulgar Italian term roughly translating as “faggottness”.

The Vatican did not respond to a request for comment.

La Repubblica attributed its story to several unspecified sources, while Corriere said it was backed up by a few, unnamed bishops, who suggested the pope, as an Argentine, might have not realised that the Italian term he used was offensive.

Political gossip website Dagospia was the first to report on the alleged incident, said to have happened on May 20, when the Italian Bishops Conference opened a four-day assembly with a non-public meeting with the pontiff.

Francis, who is 87, has so far been credited with leading the Roman Catholic Church into taking a more welcoming approach towards the LGBT community.

In 2013, at the start of his papacy, he famously said, “If a person is gay and seeks God and has good will, who am I to judge?”, while last year he allowed priests to bless members of same-sex couples, triggering substantial conservative backlash.

Nevertheless, he delivered a similar message on gay seminarians – minus the reported swear word – when he met Italian bishops in 2018, telling them to carefully vet priesthood applicants and reject any suspected homosexuals.

In a 2005 document, released under Francis’s late predecessor Benedict XVI, the Vatican said the Church could admit into the priesthood those who had clearly overcome homosexual tendencies for at least three years.

The document said practicing homosexuals and those with “deep-seated” gay tendencies and those who “support the so-called gay culture” should be barred.

(Reporting by Alvise Armellini; editing by Jonathan Oatis)

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  • Claire Scheepers says:

    Oh this would be funny if it wasn’t so tragic. As if gay men have not been priests for hundreds of years. -It’s pretty much a given. Or do they think all the little altar boys were molested by straight priests? – I guess what he meant to say was they don’t want the OPENLY gay men (ya know, the honest ones ) .. Why any religion thinks that god cares what humanity does with it’s genitalia or why ‘he’ only wants men to be priests is beyond me. – Why do we even refer to God as ‘he’ … how did some-one check God’s gender? I guess – ‘he’ gave the old testament bible writers ‘his’ preferred pronouns and they just accepted it?

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