First Thing, Daily Maverick's flagship newsletter

Join the 230 000 South Africans who read First Thing newsletter.

We'd like our readers to start paying for Daily Maverick

More specifically, we'd like those who can afford to pay to start paying. What it comes down to is whether or not you value Daily Maverick. Think of us in terms of your daily cappuccino from your favourite coffee shop. It costs around R35. That’s R1,050 per month on frothy milk. Don’t get us wrong, we’re almost exclusively fuelled by coffee. BUT maybe R200 of that R1,050 could go to the journalism that’s fighting for the country?

We don’t dictate how much we’d like our readers to contribute. After all, how much you value our work is subjective (and frankly, every amount helps). At R200, you get it back in Uber Eats and ride vouchers every month, but that’s just a suggestion. A little less than a week’s worth of cappuccinos.

We can't survive on hope and our own determination. Our country is going to be considerably worse off if we don’t have a strong, sustainable news media. If you’re rejigging your budgets, and it comes to choosing between frothy milk and Daily Maverick, we hope you might reconsider that cappuccino.

We need your help. And we’re not ashamed to ask for it.

Our mission is to Defend Truth. Join Maverick Insider.

Support Daily Maverick→
Payment options

Gunman kills four in Oklahoma medical center, police sa...

Newsdeck

Shooter kills 4 in Oklahoma

Gunman kills four in Oklahoma medical center, police say

Activists rally demanding action on gun safety laws outside the US Capitol in Washington, DC, USA 26 May 2022. Activists gathered in the wake of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary in Uvalde, Texas and are demanding action on gun safety legislation. (Photo: EPA-EFE/Shawn Thew / Pool)
By Reuters
02 Jun 2022 0

TULSA, Okla., June 1 (Reuters) - A man armed with a rifle and a handgun killed four people inside a medical building in Tulsa, Oklahoma on Wednesday before fatally shooting himself, police said, in the latest of a series of mass shootings to rattle the United States.

  • Gunman kills four, fatally shoots himself – police
  • Police say response to shooting was three minutes
  • Victims believed to include patients, staff

Adds details

By Michael Noble Jr.

Police arrived at the St. Francis Hospital campus three minutes after receiving a call about the shooting on Wednesday afternoon and followed the sound of gunfire up to the Natalie Building’s second floor, Tulsa deputy police chief Eric Dalgleish told reporters.

The officers made contact with the victims and the suspect five minutes later, Dalgleish said.

Police responses have come under increased scrutiny after a gunman killed 19 children and two teachers in a Texas school classroom last week while officers waited outside for nearly an hour. Read full story

Asked by reporters whether police had refreshed training or thinking about active shooters after the Uvalde, Texas school shooting, Dalgleish said: “I think that’s probably fresh on everyone’s minds.”

“I will say Tulsa revisits that topic regularly. I was very happy with what we know so far regarding the response of our officers,” Dalgleish said.

Wednesday’s incident in Tulsa came on the heels of mass shootings that have reignited debates about gun control. Two weeks before the Uvalde shooting, a white gunman killed 10 people at a supermarket in a Black neighborhood in Buffalo, New York.

Police in Tulsa said they were trying to determine the suspect’s identity, who they estimated was aged between 35 and 40, and had no details yet on his motive.

The Natalie Building contains doctors’ offices including an orthopedic center, Dalgleish said, adding he believed the victims included employees and patients.

The White House said President Joe Biden had been briefed on the shooting and offered support to state and local officials in Tulsa, a city of some 411,000 people that sits around 100 miles (160 km) northeast of the capital Oklahoma City.

(Reporting by Michael Noble Jr. In Tulsa, Dan Whitcomb in Los Angeles, Daniel Trotta in Carlsbad, California, and Rami Ayyub and Eric Beech in Washington; Editing by Stephen Coates, Sandra Maler, Lincoln Feast and Michael Perry)

Gallery

Comments - share your knowledge and experience

Please note you must be a Maverick Insider to comment. Sign up here or sign in if you are already an Insider.

Everybody has an opinion but not everyone has the knowledge and the experience to contribute meaningfully to a discussion. That’s what we want from our members. Help us learn with your expertise and insights on articles that we publish. We encourage different, respectful viewpoints to further our understanding of the world. View our comments policy here.

No Comments, yet

Please peer review 3 community comments before your comment can be posted