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.S. warns companies of 'reputational risks' of doing bu...

Newsdeck

US warns against business in Sudan

.S. warns companies of ‘reputational risks’ of doing business in Sudan

epaselect epa09718581 Sudanese protesters clash with security forces during a protest against military coup, in Khartoum, Sudan, 30 January 2022. According to medical sources, a protester was killed in clashes that erupted during a protest against the military coup that seized power on 25 October 2021 as protesters attempted to march towards the presidential palace while security forces used tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse the march. The Protesters continue demonstrations in Khartoum and other cities calling for a civilian government and democratic transition. EPA-EFE/STRINGER
By Reuters
24 May 2022 0

WASHINGTON, May 23 (Reuters) - The United States issued an advisory on Monday warning U.S. companies of growing reputational risks of doing business with state-owned enterprises and military-controlled firms in Sudan.

“These risks arise from, among other things, recent actions undertaken by Sudan’s Sovereign Council and security forces under the military’s command, including and especially serious human rights abuse against protesters,” State Department spokesperson Ned Price said in a statement.

The African country has been racked by protests since a military coup in October, and lawyers say dozens of political prisoners remain in detention.

“Businesses and individuals operating in Sudan should undertake increased due diligence related to human rights issues and be aware of the potential reputational risks of conducting business activities and/or transactions with SOEs and military-controlled companies,” Price said.

The advisory was issued by the U.S. departments of State, Treasury, Commerce and Labor, he said.

(Reporting by Eric Beech; Editing by Tim Ahmann, Bernard Orr)

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