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U.S. agencies direct $670 million to international food...

Newsdeck

US promises food aid worldwide

U.S. agencies direct $670 million to international food aid in wake of Ukraine invasion

epa08212361 Food rations provided by the World Food Programme (WFP) sit at an aid distribution center in Sana'a, Yemen, 11 February 2020 (Issued 12 February 2020). According to reports, international donors have warned that humanitarian assistance could be scaled-down to the Houthi-held northern areas of Yemen, accusing the Houthis of diverting food assistance from the hungriest people of war-ridden Yemen. Over 24 million people are in desperate need of humanitarian aid due to a five-year armed conflict between the Saudi-backed Yemeni government and the Houthis. EPA-EFE/YAHYA ARHAB
By Reuters
28 Apr 2022 0

April 27 (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) will together contribute nearly $700 million to international food aid efforts in the wake of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, the agencies said on Wednesday.

By Leah Douglas

The money will go to emergency food operations in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan and Yemen. $282 million will come from the Bill Emerson Humanitarian Trust (BEHT), which is co-managed by the agencies.

USDA will additionally provide $388 million for transportation, shipping, and other costs, the agency said.

“Russia’s unprovoked war on Ukraine, a fellow major agricultural export country, is driving food and energy costs higher for people around the world,” said Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack in a statement.

Members of the Senate Hunger Caucus in March called on USDA and USAID to draw upon funds from the BEHT, not done since 2014, as the United Nations’ World Food Programme predicted dire global famine resulting from interruptions to Ukraine and Russian exports. Read full story

Together, Russia and Ukraine account for about a quarter of world wheat exports.

The invasion was leading to a “staggering global food crisis,” said USAID Administrator Samantha Power.

Russia calls its actions in Ukraine a “special operation” to disarm Ukraine and protect it from fascists. Ukraine and the West say the fascist allegation is baseless and that the war is an unprovoked act of aggression.

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