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Landslide kills at least 24 people in Ecuador's capital...

Newsdeck

Ecuador

Landslide kills at least 24 people in Ecuador’s capital, 12 still missing

epa09721409 An aerial view showing the damage caused by the rains of the previous day, which affected some neighborhoods in the west of the Ecuadorian capital in Quito, Ecuador, 01 February 2022. The number of people who died on 31 January rose to 18 after a flood that affected several neighborhoods in the west of the Ecuadorian capital, a city that was hit by a heavy downpour, with record rainfall, according to authorities. EPA-EFE/JOSE JACOME
By Reuters
02 Feb 2022 0

QUITO, Feb 1 (Reuters) - At least 24 people perished in a landslide in Ecuador's capital Quito, and 12 others were missing, Mayor Santiago Guarderas said on Tuesday, as rescue teams searched homes and streets covered by mud following the worst deluge in nearly two decades.

The torrential rains on Monday night caused a build-up of water in a gorge near the working class neighborhoods of La Gasca and La Comuna, sending mud and rocks down on residences and affecting electricity provision.

The country’s disaster management agency said 48 people were injured.

“We saw this immense black river that was dragging along everything, we had to climb the walls to escape,” said resident Alba Cotacachi, who evacuated her two young daughters from their home. “We are looking for the disappeared.”

Footage obtained by Reuters showed a man struggling to free himself from the muddy waters rushing down a residential street. Reuters witnesses said the man was swept away as residents screamed for help.

Other videos showed a torrent sweeping away trees, vehicles, dumpsters and even electricity poles, while some people were rescued from the muddy water by neighbors.

Authorities have not ruled out the possibility of further landslides. The mayor’s office has set up shelters for affected families and has started clearing streets in the city.

Ecuador is facing heavy rains in several areas, which have caused rivers to overflow and affected hundreds of homes and roads.

Rains in Quito on Monday were equivalent to 75 liters per square meter, the highest in nearly two decades.

By Alexandra Valencia.

(Reporting by Alexandra Valencia Writing by Julia Symmes Cobb, Oliver Griffin and Jane Wardell; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama, Alistair Bell & Simon Cameron-Moore)

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