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Turkey ratifies Paris climate agreement; last G20 count...

Newsdeck

World

Turkey ratifies Paris climate agreement; last G20 country to do so

HEBEI, CHINA -JUNE 2: Smoke and steam billows from a Chinese state owned steel plant on June 2, 2017 in Hebei, China. China, the world's largest polluter, reaffirmed its commitment to the Paris Climate Accord Friday, after US President Donald Trump announced his intentions to withdraw the United States from the agreement on Thursday. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images) Photographer: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images AsiaPac
By Reuters
06 Oct 2021 0

ISTANBUL, Oct 6 (Reuters) - Turkey's parliament ratified the Paris climate agreement on Wednesday, making it the last G20 country to do so, after holding off for years due to what it saw as injustices in its responsibilities as part of the agreement.

Turkey has been a signatory to the Paris agreement since April 2016. But Ankara had not ratified the deal, arguing that it should not be considered a developed country as part of the agreement, which gives it more responsibility, as Turkey is historically responsible for a very small share of carbon emissions.

Announcing that Turkey would ratify the deal at the United Nations General Assembly last month, President Tayyip Erdogan said countries that have a “historical responsibility” for climate change should make the most effort.

“Whoever made the most damage to nature, our air, our water, our soil, the earth; whoever savagely exploited natural resources needs to make the largest contribution to the fight against climate change,” he said.

On Wednesday, 353 members of Turkey’s parliament ratified the agreement unanimously.

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change currently lists Turkey in the Annex I group, described as industrialised countries.

A statement approved by parliament said Turkey was ratifying the deal as a developing country and would implement it as long as it did not “harm its right to economic and social development.”

Turkey has also sent a proposal to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Secretariat in Bonn to have its name removed from the Annex I list.

The proposal is on the provisional agenda for the COP26 Climate Change Conference to be held in Glasgow from Oct. 31 to Nov. 12.

If Turkey is removed from the Annex I list of countries, it would be able to benefit from investment, insurance and technology transfer that can be provided as part of the agreement. (Reporting by Ali Kucukgocmen; Editing by Leslie Adler and Hugh Lawson)

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