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China three-child policy may not change national birthr...

Newsdeck

World

China three-child policy may not change national birthrate -Moody’s

Shipping containers next to gantry cranes at the Yangshan Deepwater Port in Shanghai, China, on Monday, Jan, 11, 2021. U.S. President Donald Trump famously tweeted that "trade wars are good, and easy to win" in 2018 as he began to impose tariffs on about $360 billion of imports from China. Turns out he was wrong on both counts. Photographer: Qilai Shen/Bloomberg
By Reuters
07 Jun 2021 1

June 7 (Reuters) - Rating agency Moody's Investors Service said on Monday that China's new policy allowing couples to have up to three children could support fertility, but was unlikely to dramatically change the national birthrate.

 

The rating agency said that the policy highlighted the risk of aging across emerging markets in Asia.

“And although China’s new policy allowing couples to have up to three children could support fertility, it is unlikely to dramatically change the national birthrate, meaning that aging will remain a credit-negative constraint”, Moody’s said in a statement.

(Reporting by Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru; Editing by Christian Schmollinger)

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  • So by 2100 Africa’s population will be 4bn and the rest of the world 5bn …. Why the rest of the world needs to take an interest in what happens here.

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