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SA and its tax trouble – how do we fix the problem?

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SA and its tax trouble – how do we fix the problem?

By PSG
10 Apr 2021 2

SA’s ability to shake off its reputation as an ‘incapable state’ depends in no small part on its ability to resolve its tax revenue dilemma. Low economic growth is not helping matters, but an inefficient tax system further complicates South Africa’s tax revenue challenge. While many South Africans pay their fair share, many are also guilty of tax evasion – making the tax base far smaller than it should be and putting a higher burden on those who do pay their fair share. The tax issue is a serious one that South Africa needs to resolve urgently so the country can move forward and achieve its full potential.

We need to acknowledge that our tax systems have been decimated by years of mismanagement and getting the right capabilities in place now is key. SA has immensely competent individuals who are more than capable of playing their role in this process, but do we have the political will to do so? SA undoubtedly has a long road ahead before its taxpayers will feel they are getting ‘value for money’.

Judge Dennis Davis is the next guest in the PSG Think Big webinar series, and he will be talking to series host and acclaimed journalist Bruce Whitfield about the real challenges facing the country when it comes to tax collection. 

“This conversation, as is the case in all webinars in our Think Big series, aims to get to the bottom of some of the biggest questions confronting our country,” says Tracy Hirst, Chief Marketing Officer for financial services group PSG. 

The upcoming discussion is sure to shed some light on the issues, and possible solutions, to the current tax conundrum. PSG offers free entry to this ground-breaking virtual thought leadership series. Book your free seat here.

The best seat in the house #ThinkBigPSG

PSG’s Think Big Series has been running since last year July and has received overwhelmingly positive feedback. Trusted information from industry experts and thought leaders is essential for our democracy, and PSG is proud to host some of South Africa’s leading independent thinkers to present their views on the challenges we face, and – more importantly – the solutions we need.

Don’t miss any of PSG’s upcoming Think Big sessions. Click here to book your free, virtual seat. 


#ThinkBigPSG Upcoming speakers and topics

Topic: The future of taxation in South Africa

Tuesday, 13 April, 10h00 – 11h00

Judge Dennis Davis, Former Judge of the High Court and Judge President of the Competition Appeal Court

 

Topic: The future of medical vaccinations

Tuesday, 20 April, 10h00 – 11h00

Prof Shabir Madhi, Professor of Vaccinology in the School of Pathology at the University of the Witwatersrand and Director of the Medical Research Council Vaccines and Infectious Diseases Analytics Research Unit (VIDA)

 

Topic: The future of the Western Cape 

Tuesday, 11 May, 10h00-11h00

Alan Winde, Premier of the Western Cape

 

Topic: The future of social support and upliftment in South Africa

Tuesday, 25 May, 10h00-11h00

Dr Imtiaz Sooliman, Founder and Chairman of Gift of the Givers

 

Topic: The future of remote work

Tuesday, 8 June, 10h00-11h00

Stafford Masie, Former MD of Google South Africa, General Manager at WeWork South Africa

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