Newsdeck

Newsdeck

Nigerian army says it intervened in protests at Lagos government’s request

epa08773339 A flower is placed under a placard with the inscription 'Black Tuesday' near the Lekki toll plaza damaged after a military attack on protesters protesting against the Nigeria rogue police, otherwise know as Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS), in Lagos, Nigeria, 25 October 2020. Following two weeks of street protests against the police Special Anti-Robbery Squad, otherwise known as SARS, burnt vehicles and damaged buildings remain visible across the city as normalcy returns to Lagos on Saturday 24 October 2020, after the Lagos metropolitan government eased the 72-hour curfew to disperse the protest against the Nigeria rogue police. EPA-EFE/AKINTUNDE AKINLEYE
By Reuters
28 Oct 2020 0

ABUJA, Oct 28 (Reuters) - Nigeria's Lagos state government asked the army to intervene to restore order amidst anti-police brutality protests, but soldiers did not shoot civilians, the military said.

Nigeria has been on edge following one of its biggest social upheavals in 20 years. Demonstrations across the country turned violent on Oct. 20 when witnesses in Lagos said the military opened fire on peaceful protesters shortly after local authorities imposed a 24-hour curfew, drawing international condemnation.

The Lagos government asked the army to deploy due to “violence which led to several police stations being burnt, policemen killed, suspects in police custody released and weapons carted away,” the military said in a statement published late on Tuesday said.

“The Nigerian army in the discharge of its constitutional responsibilities did not shoot at any civilian as there are glaring and convincing evidence to attest to this fact,” the statement said, without providing details of the evidence.

The army, which has said it was not at the site of the shooting at the Lekki Toll Gate, and the Lagos state governor’s office did not respond to calls and messages seeking comment. The military statement did not say how they intervened to curb unrest beyond denying that its men shot civilians.

Police and soldiers killed at least 12 people in two Lagos neighbourhoods on Oct. 20, according to witnesses and rights group Amnesty International. Police have also denied involvement.

Witnesses at Lekki described armed men in army fatigues arriving at the site of the peaceful protests around 7 p.m., where demonstrators knelt to wave flags and sing the national anthem, before the men raised their guns and shot into the crowd. (Reporting by Camillus Eboh in Abuja; Additional reporting by Libby George and Alexis Akwagyiram in Lagos; Writing by Paul Carsten, Editing by William Maclean)

Gallery

Comments - share your knowledge and experience

Please note you must be a Maverick Insider to comment. Sign up here or sign in if you are already an Insider.

Everybody has an opinion but not everyone has the knowledge and the experience to contribute meaningfully to a discussion. That’s what we want from our members. Help us learn with your expertise and insights on articles that we publish. We encourage different, respectful viewpoints to further our understanding of the world. View our comments policy here.

No Comments, yet

Please peer review 3 community comments before your comment can be posted