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Lives will be lost as Syria aid access cut, aid agencie...

Newsdeck

COVID-19

Lives will be lost as Syria aid access cut, aid agencies warn

epa08538880 International humanitarian aid at Bab al-Hawa Turkey- Syria border crossing, Syria, 09 July 2020. Accoriding to local media sources and various NGOs operating in northwestern Syria, the UN humanitarian agencies mandated by the UN Security Council Resolution 2504, which aimed to allow transborder aid delivery into northwestern Syria, is due to expire on 10 July. If it is not renewed in its current form or another, the about 3 million people in the area who depend on it will be deeply affected. The resolution allowed UN agencies to deliver the aid to the rebel held areas without permission form the Syrian government through two specific border crossings. EPA-EFE/STR
By Reuters
13 Jul 2020 0

BEIRUT, July 12 (Reuters) - A U.N. Security Council resolution that leaves only one of two border crossings open for aid deliveries from Turkey into rebel-held northwestern Syria will cost lives and intensify the suffering of 1.3 million people living there, aid agencies said.

Western states had pressed for aid access to continue through two crossings at the Turkish border, but Russia, President Bashar al-Assad’s main ally in his war against, and China vetoed a last-ditch effort on Friday to keep both open.

“In northwest Syria, where a vital cross-border lifeline has been closed … it will be harder to reach an estimated 1.3 million people dependent on food and medicine delivered by the U.N. cross-border,” aid agencies operating in Syria said in a joint statement.

“Many will now not receive the help they need. Lives will be lost. Suffering will intensify.”

“With the first case of COVID-19 confirmed in Idlib, an area with a severely weakened health infrastructure, this is a devastating blow,” the statement added.

In a separate statement, Physicians for Human Rights said the resolution had shut down “direct routes to hundreds of thousands of displaced Syrians in dire need of food and medicine”.

Russia and China have argued that the northwest can be reached from within Syria, meaning via government-held territory, and that aid deliveries from Turkey violate Syria’s sovereignty.

“This issue should not be politicized,” deputy Russian U.N. envoy Dmitry Polyanskiy said after the vote.

Louis Charbonneau, U.N. director at Human Rights Watch, said: “Council members buckled and gave Moscow what it wanted – a further drastic reduction of cross-border aid to desperate Syrians who rely on it for survival.” (Reporting by Tom Perry and Stephanie Nebehay Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky)

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