South Africa

#AMINEXT: Photo Essay

One voice at the Cape Town protest: “No more, no f**king more!”

One voice at the Cape Town protest: “No more, no f**king more!”
Peaceful cop. A policeman holds a poster and flower at the protest march against femicide and Gender Based Violence on 5 September 2019 outside Parliament in Cape Town. Parliament's gate is in the background. Photo: Anso Thom

5 September 2019. 10am. Parliament, Cape Town. The day a crowd, that swelled to tens of thousands, gathered for one of Cape Town’s largest protests in recent history. A collection of angry, confrontational, “gatvol”, demanding messages on posters and shouted towards the stage and heavens added colour and voice. Men took a quieter backseat as young and old women of all hues gathered for the protest march against femicide and gender-based violence. The brutal murder of University of Cape Town student Uyinene Mrwetyana, whose body was found at the weekend, has sparked an outpouring of anger and grief, but it has also sparked a “no more, no fucking more” and “enough is enough” outcry. President Cyril Ramaphosa addressed the crowd at the end of the protest. The Cape Town protest is one of several that have already taken place with a big gathering planned in Johannesburg next week.

My body, not your crime scene. There were many rightfully angry messages at the protest march against femicide and Gender-Based Violence on 5 September 2019 outside Parliament in Cape Town. Photo: Anso Thom

An unidentified woman protestor listens to Cyril Ramaphosa address the protest march against femicide and Gender-Based Violence on 5 September 2019 outside Parliament in Cape Town. Photo: Anso Thom

Mass protest. Learners and young women at a protest march against femicide and Gender-Based Violence on 5 September 2019 outside Parliament in Cape Town. Photo: Anso Thom

A protestor in front of the police line at the protest march against femicide and Gender-Based Violence on 5 September 2019 outside Parliament in Cape Town. Photo: Anso Thom

Message fence. Protestors place their posters and flowers on parliament’s fence at the end of the protest march against femicide and Gender-Based Violence on 5 September 2019 outside Parliament in Cape Town. Photo: Anso Thom

Justice for Jesse. Protestors placed posters and flowers on Parliament’s fence and gates after the protest march against femicide and Gender-Based Violence on 5 September 2019 in Cape Town. The slain bodies of UWC student Jesse Hess and her grandfather Chris were found in their Parow flat last Friday. Photo: Anso Thom

Democratic Alliance leader Mmusi Maimane attended the protest march against femicide and Gender-Based Violence on 5 September 2019 outside Parliament in Cape Town. Photo: Anso Thom

Remembering Nene. Tens of thousands participated in the protest march against femicide and Gender-Based Violence on 5 September 2019 outside Parliament in Cape Town. Most brought posters with their own messaging. This poster refers to UCT student Uyinene Mrwetyana, whose murder sparked the protest. Photo: Anso Thom

Lucinda Evans, Executive Director of Philisa Abafazi Bethu Women and Children’s Program in Lavender Hill on the Cape Flat addresses the protest march against femicide and Gender-Based Violence on 5 September 2019 outside Parliament in Cape Town. Photo: Anso Thom

President Cyril Ramaphosa accepted a memorandum and addressed a sea of people at the protest march against femicide and Gender-Based Violence on 5 September 2019 outside Parliament in Cape Town. Photo: Anso Thom

Enough is enough. A sea of people at the protest march against femicide and Gender-Based Violence on 5 September 2019 outside Parliament in Cape Town. Photo: Anso Thom

On Notice. Protestors placed their posters on Parliament’s fence following the protest march against femicide and Gender-Based Violence on 5 September 2019 outside Parliament in Cape Town. Photo: Anso Thom

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