First Thing, Daily Maverick's flagship newsletter

Join the 230 000 South Africans who read First Thing newsletter.

We'd like our readers to start paying for Daily Maverick

More specifically, we'd like those who can afford to pay to start paying. What it comes down to is whether or not you value Daily Maverick. Think of us in terms of your daily cappuccino from your favourite coffee shop. It costs around R35. That’s R1,050 per month on frothy milk. Don’t get us wrong, we’re almost exclusively fuelled by coffee. BUT maybe R200 of that R1,050 could go to the journalism that’s fighting for the country?

We don’t dictate how much we’d like our readers to contribute. After all, how much you value our work is subjective (and frankly, every amount helps). At R200, you get it back in Uber Eats and ride vouchers every month, but that’s just a suggestion. A little less than a week’s worth of cappuccinos.

We can't survive on hope and our own determination. Our country is going to be considerably worse off if we don’t have a strong, sustainable news media. If you’re rejigging your budgets, and it comes to choosing between frothy milk and Daily Maverick, we hope you might reconsider that cappuccino.

We need your help. And we’re not ashamed to ask for it.

Our mission is to Defend Truth. Join Maverick Insider.

Support Daily Maverick→
Payment options

Raging 'Fortnite' eSport game gets $100 mn prize pool

Newsdeck

Newsdeck

Raging ‘Fortnite’ eSport game gets $100 mn prize pool

uL Gaming play against BRK Esports as part of a show match before the semi finals of the Rainbow Six Siege Invitational Tournament held in Montreal, Canada, 17 February 2018. EPA-EFE/ANDRE PICHETTE
By AFP
22 May 2018 0

Epic Games on Monday stoked the blazing popularity of its "Fortnite" death-match video game by putting up $100 million in prize money for eSports competitions.

The announcement of the rich prize money is a milestone for the emerging sector of eSports, or video gaming as a spectator sport.

“Fortnite” became an eSports phenomena after the release late last year of a “Battle Royale” mode that lets up to 100 players vie to be the last character standing on ever-shrinking terrain.

Players can survive by working with allies, or hiding, but the boundaries of arenas contract with damage inflicted to characters who remain outside.

“Since the launch of Fortnite Battle Royale we’ve watched the passion for community competition grow and can’t wait to empower you to battle with the best,” the Fortnite team said in an online post announced a $100 million pool of prize money for eSport matches for the 2018-2019 season.

“We’re getting behind competitive play in a big way, but our approach will be different – we plan to be more inclusive, and focused on the joy of playing and watching the game.”

Epic promised to disclose more in the weeks ahead about the competition.

Epic declined to update a figure it released in January saying that more than 45 million people played “Fortnite.”

Fortnite game-play uploads and viewing have been hot at YouTube, according to the Alphabet-owned video sharing platform.

Snippets being uploaded to YouTube include people trying to do Fortnite dance moves in real life.

Epic expanded the range of potential players by making Fortnite accessible on Xbox and PlayStation consoles as well as on computers and Apple mobile devices.

A version of the game tailored for play on mobile devices powered by Google-backed Android software has been promised for later this year. DM

Gallery

Please peer review 3 community comments before your comment can be posted