First Thing, Daily Maverick's flagship newsletter

Join the 230 000 South Africans who read First Thing newsletter.

We'd like our readers to start paying for Daily Maverick

More specifically, we'd like those who can afford to pay to start paying. What it comes down to is whether or not you value Daily Maverick. Think of us in terms of your daily cappuccino from your favourite coffee shop. It costs around R35. That’s R1,050 per month on frothy milk. Don’t get us wrong, we’re almost exclusively fuelled by coffee. BUT maybe R200 of that R1,050 could go to the journalism that’s fighting for the country?

We don’t dictate how much we’d like our readers to contribute. After all, how much you value our work is subjective (and frankly, every amount helps). At R200, you get it back in Uber Eats and ride vouchers every month, but that’s just a suggestion. A little less than a week’s worth of cappuccinos.

We can't survive on hope and our own determination. Our country is going to be considerably worse off if we don’t have a strong, sustainable news media. If you’re rejigging your budgets, and it comes to choosing between frothy milk and Daily Maverick, we hope you might reconsider that cappuccino.

We need your help. And we’re not ashamed to ask for it.

Our mission is to Defend Truth. Join Maverick Insider.

Support Daily Maverick→
Payment options

Images of Marikana, August 16, 2013

South Africa

South Africa

Images of Marikana, August 16, 2013

On August 16, thousands of people returned to the infamous koppies in Marikana for the commemoration marking one year since 34 people were killed by police. GREG NICOLSON brings you the photos.

Photo: Miners chant slogans during the one-year anniversary commemorations to mark the killings of 34 striking platinum miners shot dead by police outside the Lonmin Marikana platinum mine in Rustenburg, 100 km (62 miles) northwest of Johannesburg, August 16, 2013. South Africa’s government and ruling African National Congress (ANC) party said they were staying away from the commemorations on Friday. The decision revealed political splits and tensions still surrounding the so-called “Marikana Massacre”, which was the bloodiest security incident since the end of apartheid in 1994. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Photo: Well over 5,000 people attended the event, which featured creative performances and speeches by workers, Lonmin management, religious leaders, lawyers involved in the Marikana Commission, and multiple political parties. (Greg Nicolson)

Photo: Economic Freedom Fighters leader Julius Malema had many supporters in the crowd and he used his speech to lambast President Jacob Zuma, the police and Lonmin management for not accepting responsibility for the 16 August massacre. (Greg Nicolson)

Photo: A woman dabs her eyes during the one-year anniversary commemorations to mark the killings of 34 striking platinum miners shot dead by police outside the Lonmin’s Marikana platinum mine in Rustenburg, 100 km (62 miles) northwest of Johannesburg, August 16, 2013. South Africa’s ANC government pulled out at the last minute from a memorial ceremony marking the anniversary of the nation’s bloodiest post-apartheid labour violence, drawing attention to the dominant party’s loss of support among many mineworkers. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Photo: Workers’ ongoing struggles and the demand for justice were key themes of the day. The demand for a R12,500 salary was often mentioned. (Greg Nicolson)

Photo: The koppie where the striking miners spent their time last year before being killed was covered with people. Here, workers pray in front. (Greg Nicolson)

Photo: Some workers said it was a painful day to return to the area and the koppie where the killings happened. (Greg Nicolson)

Photo: Lonmin workers continued to show their support for the Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (AMCU) and their disdain for the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM). (Greg Nicolson)

Photo: Advocate Dali Mpofu was the event’s MC and multiple speakers talked about his legal team at the Marikana Commission fighting to get funding from government. At a worker’s request, buckets were passed through the crowd for donations tothe legal fees. (Greg Nicolson)

Main photo: The day started with wave after wave of mineworkers marching towards the koppies while singing songs of their struggle. (Greg Nicolson)

Gallery

Please peer review 3 community comments before your comment can be posted