South Africa, World

First Thing with Simon Williamson: SA to pay for grounded Clifton vessel

By Simon Williamson 17 May 2012

Thursday 17 May 2012 We're celebrating the launch of the new-look Daily Maverick website at Seattle Coffee Co, Hyde Park, JHB on Monday 21 May, at 10:00. And because we can, we're buying the first 100 readers who come and join us a cup of coffee . For those who can't make it, we'll be live-tweeting Q&A with the entire team about the new site and anything that blows your hair back. #DMnewclothes

While you were sleeping

According to the SA Maritime Safety Authority, it seems as if the South African taxpayer will most likely foot the bill to remove Clifton’s most recent addition, the Eihatsu Maru fishing vessel, which ran aground on Saturday. The organisation said the department of transport will pay for the salvage operation, but aims to recover the money from the ship’s owner who has so far refused to cough up any dough. It is also unclear whether the culprit has any insurance.
News24, EWN

A senior Libyan diplomat told AFP on Wednesday that Saif al-Islam, expired dictator Muammar Gaddafi’s favourite son, refused to name a defence lawyer, and therefore couldn’t be tried under Libyan civilian law. The International Criminal Court will decide in coming months whether to allow Gaddafi Junior to be tried in a Libyan court, or whether to drag him up to The Hague. Rights organisations have expressed concerns that Nephew Leader does not have access to a defence team, but the Libyan government denies this.  
Telegraph, Reuters

International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde warned on Wednesday that Greece’s departure from the eurozone, should it not honour its austerity agreements, would be “extremely expensive and hard, and not just for Greece”. The continent’s problem child might be forced out of the eurozone as its most likely ruler in a second round of elections on 17 June, Alexis Tsipras, is anti-austerity, yet wants to remain in the eurozone. This platform is viewed as unacceptable in Brussels.
Bloomberg, BBC

Japan’s economy recorded 1% growth when compared to the previous quarter, slightly ahead of analysts’ expectations of 0.9% and in spite of a strong yen and Europe. Growth was 4.5% when compared to the same quarter last year and was due largely to consumer spending and continued rebuilding after last year’s earthquake.
Reuters, Marketwatch

Football: Kenny Daglish was sacked as Liverpool manager on Wednesday after leading one of the world’s most decorated teams to a lowly eighth place in the Premier League this season. While the club’s league form was less than satisfactory, they do have a Carling Cup in their trophy cabinet and made the FA Cup final (which they lost to Chelsea). The BBC is tossing the name of former manager Rafael Benitez, who won the Champions League with the club, as a possible replacement. Wigan manager Roberto Martinez and former Chelsea manager Andre Villas-Boas are also reportedly in the running.
Goal.com, The New York Times

Coming up today

Democratic Alliance leader Helen Zille will launch her party’s plan to unite all South Africans behind the Youth Wage Subsidy at Parliament 13:00. Lindiwe Mazibuko will be handing out shields and helmets from 12:30.

It’s International Day Against Homophobia, and no one should be in any doubt that this is a modern-day South African problem.

The Olympic flame is handed over by Greek Hellenic Olympic Committee officials to the British on Thursday to get it across the continent in time for the Olympics. If the Greeks are wise they’ll charge for it.

The Bafana Bafana squad for World Cup qualifiers against Ethiopia and Botswana will be announced at 09:30 at Nasrec.

Economic data: Statistics of civil cases for debt March 2012, Wholesale trade sales March 2012, Motor trade sales March 2012 (Statistics SA).

Weather

Bloemfontein: 2°-18°, clear
Cape Town: 10°-19°, partly cloudy
Durban: 14°-23°, clear
East London: 14°-24°, clear
Johannesburg: 7°-17°, clear
Nelspruit: 10°-24°, clear
Pietermaritzburg: 7°-22°, clear
Polokwane: 9°-22°, clear
Port Elizabeth: 14°-22°, clear
Pretoria: 7°-20°, clear

Source: Weather24

In case you missed it

Extra! Extra! Coming soon to a court near you: The Richard Mdluli Show

A pro-democracy group will now ask a judge to strip the controversial policeman of his duties until all allegations around him are tested. ALEX ELISEEV sees “people power” at play, and how we landed up here.

Analysis: The youth wage subsidy should not go the way of the nationalisation debate

The subsidy ought to be debated on its merits and how it will affect the labour market, the unemployed and the economy. But much like other policy debates have unfolded in this country, it has been politicised, polarised and locked into thoughtless ideological corners. OSIAME MOLEFE attempts to have a calm look at the proposal.

Analysis: DA vs Cosatu – any victors?

Now that the dust has settled in Braamfontein and the blue tide has retreated back over the bridge, we wonder what exactly the point of all of that was. Who won? The DA’s march to the vicinity of Cosatu House says a lot about just how dysfunctional our politics have become. It’s also a sign that things can’t continue like this. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

Bricks, Rocks, Screams: DA battles Cosatu on Johannesburg streets

The Democratic Alliance marched to Cosatu House in Johannesburg on Tuesday to promote the youth wage bill. There were plenty of flying bricks and words of war, but not much was said about the bill. By GREG NICOLSON.

Racial hatred, racial hope: the science behind prejudice

Scientists tell us that racism isn’t hardwired, giving South Africans hope for reforming prejudicial bigotry. Could the painful history of a small, almost all-white US city called Duluth, and the science of how our minds acquire and process prejudice, hold clues to help South Africa re-engineer racists? MANDY DE WAAL investigates.

WWF report: Save the planet or start praying for a new one

Every two years, the World Wide Fund for Nature brings out a “state of the planet” review. This year, the news is bleaker than ever before. By REBECCA DAVIS.

Saudi Arabia and Bahrain – Towards an (un)holy matrimony

This week, leaders of the Persian Gulf gathered in Riyadh to discuss a Saudi-led initiative to create a union of gulf states, rumoured to be modelled on the European Union. Onlookers expected the announcement of an immediate union between Saudi Arabia and Bahrain. Instead, the meeting concluded with the Saudis conceding to the other members’ pleas for more time. By KHADIJA PATEL.

DA vs COSATU: Photos

A day of sticks, stones and broken bones as seen by our photo-reporters.

SA headed for stalemate over AU and has nothing up its sleeve

Unless the South African government gets its head out of the sand over the next chairperson of the AU, there’ll be another stalemate in Lilongwe – and our already battered reputation will take another hammering. By SIMON ALLISON.

Analysis: ANC’s ever-disappearing minority support

Many people were surprised on Tuesday that the Democratic Alliance’s march to Cosatu House was dominated by black people rather than the party’s traditional constituency of liberal white people. It is a sign that race politics in South Africa is changing, a phenomenon which the ruling ANC appears not to be responsive to. By RANJENI MUNUSAMY.

GOP 2012: Paul, the dynasty

Texas Congressman Ron Paul announced on Monday that he has now ended active campaigning for the presidency against Mitt Romney, theP only other Republican Party candidate left in the campaign. But Paul vowed he would fight on with his so-called “delegate strategy”. J BROOKS SPECTOR looks deeper into the reasons why.

March, the beloved country

If you can avoid the rocks, marching is an essential pastime for all South Africans, writes musical comedian DEEP FRIED MAN, who is not averse to the occasional toyi-toyi himself.

Rejoice! The return of one-sided cricket

Real cricket finally returns to our screens when England and West Indies lock horns in the first Test at Lord’s on Thursday. ANT SIMS looks ahead to what awaits the visitors and… there’s nothing but bad news.

Walter Baets: Losing confidence and changing business models are two different things

The Reputation Institute 2012 survey shows South Africans are losing confidence in the leadership in the private sector. Great. Now we can start to have the kind of robust debate this country and the world so badly needs about the true purpose of business. And hopefully this will amount to something important and meaningful.

Jacques Rousseau: Freedom of speech; oh, perish the thought

While the outrage at racist speech is appropriate and justified, we shouldn’t forgot that legal censure is only one option for dealing with hateful speech – and that it might not be our best option.

DM

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Photo: A tugboat attempts to refloat fishing vessel Eihatsu Maru which ran aground at Clifton, one of Cape Town’s most popular tourist beaches, May 15, 2012. Rescuers evacuated 19 of the 28 Tiawanese crew aboard the fishing vessel on Saturday. South Africa will now have to foot the bill. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings.

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