Media

iMaverick, Wednesday 26 October

By iMaverick Team 26 October 2011

Malema's three days of candour; Zuma's reshuffle, revisited; Gordhan's fight for jobs; Kenya's war, week two; and the power of words. By iMAVERICK TEAM.

One planet, 15 minutes

It happened overnight; South Africa, Africa, World, Business, Life, etc, and Sport briefs.

JACQUES ROUSSEAU: TWITTER – FAST FOOD FOR EVER- FATTENING EGOS

Most of us have heard the aphorism: “Know yourself”. Its meaning and implications have titivated minds both great and not-so-great for centuries. A Greek encyclopaedia from the 10th century explained it as “applied to those whose boasts exceed what they are” and that “know thyself”was a warning to pay no attention to the opinion of the multitude. Sounds a lot like the Twitterati.

10 more minutes

MALEMA HEARING RESUMES AS YOUTH GET FIRED UP FOR MARCH

ANC Youth League leader Julius Malema took a breather from his economic freedom march campaign schedule on Tuesday to prepare for the final stretch of his disciplinary hearing, where only the Mother of the Nation is yet to testify. CARIEN DU PLESSIS reports.

ANC HOPES TO COIN IT WITH GOLD MEDALLIONS

As part of its centenary celebrations, the African National Congress has issued a line of 1kg gold coins, costing a tidy R1.2 million each. The party expects to raise R500 million from sales. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

WHO KILLED GADDAFI AND WHO REALLY CARES?

With the deposed Libyan leader dead almost a week, rumours continue to swirl about who was actually responsible for killing him. There are at least three completely contradictory accounts being aired – but does it even matter? By REBECCA DAVIS.

GADDAFI RESTS IN PEACE, AND IN SECRET

In death, there was little dignity afforded to Muammar Gaddafi. The details of his capture and killing are murky, and only after five days of decay was his rotting corpse unceremoniously buried somewhere in the Libyan desert. Was this a fitting end for the larger-than-life dictator? asks SIMON ALLISON.

DIRCO DENIES GADDAFI FAMILY IS HEADED FOR SA

Soon after Muammar Gaddafi was laid to rest on Tuesday morning, Algerian online newspaper Al-Shuruk claimed his surviving family members had chosen exile in South Africa instead of a Gulf state. Not according to Dirco. By KHADIJA PATEL.

SAME-SEX MARRIAGE ‘LIKE TERRORISM’, SAYS NIGERIAN SENATOR

A Nigerian law to criminalise same-sex marriages is about to be passed, justified by the kind of homophobia that’s all too common in many African countries. Rights groups are horrified, but powerless. But this could be Britain’s chance to prove it’s serious about protecting gay rights in developing countries. By SIMON ALLISON.

US NARCO-AGENTS QUIETLY UNDER COVER IN MEXICAN CARTELS

US agents have long been infiltrating Mexican drug cartels to stop them getting too close to the southern states. Technically it’s illegal, but Mexico looks the other way because it has a huge problem with the ongoing war between the various cartels. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

IMF CONSIDERING PARTICIPATION IN EU BAILOUT

The International Monetary Fund is considering taking part in a special investment vehicle being proposed by the eurozone bailout fund but has not made a decision yet, eurozone officials said on Tuesday. By JAN STRUPCZEWSKI and FRANCESCA LANDINI (Reuters).

CRITERIA SHOW IT AIN’T EASY BECOMING A SAINT

This weekend Pope Benedict XVI created three new Catholic saints to add to the 31 he has canonised since taking up the papacy in 2005. How do you go about getting a sainthood these days? By REBECCA DAVIS.

AS DRIVERS GROW FATTER, SO DO CRASH TEST DUMMIES

The EuroNCAP, the toughest car safety test out there, now includes a fat crash test dummy. Certain cars are also getting bigger to compensate for the added weight. Yes people, it has come to this. Unable to halt the scourge of obesity, we are resorting to less-efficient vehicles. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

TSOTSOBE CONTENT IN SUPPORTING ROLE

Lonwabo Tsotsobe is content to play second fiddle to Dale Steyn and Morne Morkel as South Africa look to wrap up a series win over Australia come the third and final ODI. By Cricket365.com.

TERRY WAITING ON POLICE PROBE

Chelsea captain John Terry is waiting to discover if police will charge him over allegations that he racially abused QPR defender Anton Ferdinand during Sunday’s heated West London derby. By Football365.com.

F1 COMING TO NEW YORK

Bernie Ecclestone is set to get his wish to stage a race in the New York City area after an official confirmed plans for a New Jersey GP in 2013. By Sport365.com.

In depth

ZUMA’S CABINET RESHUFFLE, THE MORNING AFTER

The deed has been done and now there are calls for President Jacob Zuma to recover the money from the ministers he axed, and for Public Protector Thuli Madonsela to investigate some more. Then there is also the thing with Bheki Cele. CARIEN DU PLESSIS reports.

ZUMA’S MONDAY MASSACRE AND THE IMPORTANCE OF FREE MEDIA

It’s interesting to note that at a time of increased hostility towards the media in general, and the print media in particular, newspapers would be celebrating one of their greatest victories. It hasn’t been put like this yet (and it may still be this Sunday), but surely one of the headlines that could have rung out in the wake of Monday’s series of announcements by President Jacob Zuma is “Sunday Times claims Minister, Police Commissioner”. By STEPHEN GROOTES.

NEVER MIND CREATION, GORDHAN’S MINI- BUDGET FOCUSES ON JOB RETENTION

The plan used to be to create jobs, at least according to President Jacob Zuma’s State of the Nation address. But with Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan’s mini-budget speech the reality is now clear: 2011 is the year of desperately trying to save jobs as unemployment soars above 25%. By OSIAME MOLEFE.

TREASURE THE KAROO ACTION GROUP GOES TO COURT FOR MORE CLARITY ON FRACKING INVESTIGATION

The government declared in April 2011 that the issue of hydraulic fracturing in the Karoo needs to be investigated properly, and put the brakes on granting exploration licences to energy companies. The Department of Mineral Resources promised to lead a multi-disciplinary team to investigate the issue fully. However, not all are happy with how things have panned out. The Treasure the Karoo Action Group has applied to the court to force the department to reveal who will be on the task team. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

KENYA FACES UP TO THE REALITIES OF WAR WITH TERRORISTS

More than a week after Kenya launched its full-scale military offensive into Somalia, Kenyans are beginning to understand the implications: war is dangerous and difficult, even on the home front. Already things are beginning to go wrong. By SIMON ALLISON.

IN A CONTINENT-SIZE SEE-SAW, EURO-PESSIMISM QUICKLY FOLLOWS EURO-OPTIMISM

Just as Euro-optimism seemed about to take hold tentatively, the European Union’s finance ministers abruptly cancelled their meeting to take place ahead of the meeting by the top leadership still apparently scheduled for Wednesday – and we were back to contemplating that slough of despondence again. This decision not to meet – and thus not to decide things – added to the anxiety about whether the eurozone was capable of reaching a comprehensive deal that could resolve the European debt crisis. By J BROOKS SPECTOR.

IN HIS ECONOMIC PLAN, RICK PERRY PLACES HOPES ON FLAT TAX

Republican Rick Perry proposed a broad economic plan on Tuesday centred on letting Americans pay a flat 20% income tax rate in a bid to restore the luster to his fading presidential campaign. By STEVE HOLLAND (Reuters).

PANETTA’S ASIAN MISSION: DIFFICULT, BUT STILL POSSIBLE

As the US’s new secretary of defence, Leon Panetta has new and different challenges in an ancient region – which is itself undergoing tectonic upheavals – both literally and figuratively. By J BROOKS SPECTOR.

ANALYSIS: IS AHMADINEJAD IRAN’S LAST PRESIDENT?

Some Iranians think so after Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei suggested scrapping a directly elected presidency, which critics say would weaken Iran’s version of democracy and make the Islamic Republic more Islamic than republican. By ROBIN POMEROY and RAMIN MOSTAFAVI (Reuters)

JEAN BERKO GLEASON ON HOW WORDS INFLUENCE THOUGHT

Words are powerful, influential and can change the outcome of nations, which is why from Palin to Goebbels, Stalin and Kim Jong-il, emotionally charged phrases have been able to alter minds. Jean Berko Gleason, the founding mother of psycholinguistics explains how this happens. By MANDY DE WAAL.

STYLI CHARALAMBOUS: SA TENNIS: NO GAME, NO SET, NO MATCH

South Africa has a tennis pedigree to be proud of. History books and trophies are littered with the names of players from bygone eras from this country. But the last decade had been terribly unkind to the local followers of this regal game, with a talent pool as barren as the Kalahari.

THE GOOSE: “CHAMPIONS COURSE IS SCARY”

Retief Goosen believes the Fancourt Links will offer the stiffest challenge possible when it hosts the two million euro Volvo Golf Champions in January. By Golf365.com.



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