Media

iMaverick, Monday 24 October

By iMaverick Team 24 October 2011

A generation later: All Blacks, the World Champions; Alex quiet, no thanks to government; Ndebele's U-turn on toll roads; Malema drums up support for economic freedom march; and where are the Gaddafi boys? By iMAVERICK TEAM. 

South Africa

CELE’S SACK-O- RAMA DRAMA – TO BE CONTINUED

The Sunday Independent declared on its front page it stood by its story that police chief General Bheki Cele was on his way out, while the international affairs department denied he’s off to become a diplomat. CARIEN DU PLESSIS reports.

DA WANTS ELECTIONS TO REACH SA EXPATS TOO

As DA big shots outline plans for increasing the party’s support to 30% of the national vote, one of its MPs announced it would submit a bill that would reach out to South African voters overseas. CARIEN DU PLESSIS reports.

ALEX FIRE REMAINS UNLIT, NO THANKS TO GOVERNMENT

The Alexandra township just outside Sandton avoided a flare-up of xenophobic violence on the weekend, but not by a wide enough margin to make us comfortable that there can’t still be a repeat of 2008. Until government ups its game – and starts taking community anger seriously – that threat remains. By PHILLIP DE WET and GREG NICOLSON.

MALEMA DRUMS UP SUPPORT AHEAD OF ECONOMIC FREEDOM MARCH

It’s going to be a busy week for ANC Youth League leader Julius Malema, with his disciplinary hearing resuming on Wednesday and his organisation’s “economic freedom” marches happening on Thursday and Friday. Let’s hope his health holds, because he hasn’t exactly had a restful weekend either, CARIEN DU PLESSIS reports.

WAITING FOR JULIUS

Julius Malema was touring Gauteng’s townships this weekend to garner support for the mass protests scheduled for Thursday and Friday. Some, GREG NICOLSON included, were left wanting.

NDEBELE ANNOUNCES RETHINK ON TOLL ROADS

People from different walks of life and political allegiances may have different reasons for campaigning against toll roads – in Gauteng and elsewhere – but one thing they’re agreed on is that they are a bad idea. Public pressure has been brought to bear from all quarters and now it looks as if the government is finally listening. By THERESA MALLINSON.

FREEDOM’S JUST ANOTHER WORD FOR NOTHING LEFT TO LOSE

From now on, governments will have to figure out how to deal with the growing tide of demands for economic and political equality, and greater freedom that will be generated by electronic mobs. Is any nation really ready to cope with these waves crashing towards governments, asks J BROOKS SPECTOR.

Opinionistas

SIPHO HLONGWANE: WHAT COMES AFTER MALEMA’S MASS ACTION?

On Thursday and Friday the “99% of South Africa” will march to the Chamber of Mines, the Johannesburg Stock Exchange and the Union Buildings to make themselves heard. But what will happen afterwards? There’s a real danger that for the people marching for better service delivery, the mass action will only serve to prove how useless mass actions are when it comes to swaying our government. Which will likely lead to even angrier riots.

Africa

TUNISIAN REVOLUTION CULMINATES IN ELECTIONS

The Tunisian elections were the first major test of the Arab Spring. Earlier this year, Tunisia showed the world how to topple a dictator. On Sunday, it showed the world how to replace a hated regime with a representative, elected government. SIMON ALLISON looks at Tunisia’s historic polls.

INTERNATIONAL OPERATION HAS AL SHABAAB ON THE ROPES

What started as the reaction of an angry Kenya is swiftly gaining international momentum. Al Shabaab is facing attacks on multiple fronts, and so far has found it difficult to make good on its leaders’ grand claims of retribution. By SIMON ALLISON.

PRESS FREEDOM THREATENED IN MAURITIUS AS JOURNALIST JAILED

Mauritius is one of the few countries in Africa that is ranked as having a free media, according to the Freedom House press freedom report of 2011. But this doesn’t mean it’s an easy ride for the country’s journalists, as editor Dharmanand Dhooharika found out when he was thrown in jail last week. By THERESA MALLINSON.

WHERE ARE THE GADDAFI BOYS?

After a coroner’s report revealed Muammar Gaddafi died of a gunshot wound to the head, Libya’s National Transitional Council (NTC) announced on Sunday that they would hand over the former Libyan leader’s body to his extended family. It is unclear exactly who is brave enough to own up to being a relative of the Colonel. The Gaddafis have already paid a hefty price for the pomp and privilege the Gaddafi name had afforded. By KHADIJA PATEL.

ZUMA ROLLS OUT RED CARPET FOR AFRICA’S NEWEST LONGEST-SERVING DICTATOR

South Africa pulled out all the stops to welcome President Teodoro Obiang of Equatorial Guinea on a full state visit, which achieved little in the way of concrete agreements, but did raise some questions (not addressed in the press conference, naturally) about just how close we want to be to one of Africa’s most notorious leaders. By SIMON ALLISON.

World

NUCLEAR RIVALS PAKISTAN AND INDIA ON THE UN SECURITY COUNCIL

There’s not a lot of love lost between neighbours Pakistan and India. They’ve fought wars over their differences. Now they share a platform on the United Nation’s Security Council. Not that they hope to turn the forum into a mosh pit where they can duke it out, or anything like that. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

AFGHANISTAN WOULD STAND WITH PAKISTAN IN WAR AGAINST THE US, SAYS HAMID KARZAI

Just days after US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton visited with him, Afghan President Hamid Karzai has delivered his strongest statement against the US yet. In an interview with Pakistan’s Geo Television broadcast on Saturday, he said in the event of war between Pakistan and the US, Afghanistan would side with its Pakistan. By KHADIJA PATEL.

OUT DAMNED SPOT: WESTERN SQUEAMISHNESS OVER GADDAFI’S DEATH EXPOSES THE LIE

As the Arab Spring gives way to autumn, it has claimed another tyrant’s head for the mantle. Muammar Gaddafi is now dead—dragged like a dog from a drainpipe and killed by a mob. But the way he died— not unlike the way Saddam Hussein was executed—has exposed the West’s bloodied hands, and its selective squeamishness. By RICHARD POPLAK.

Business

MURDOCH UNREPENTANT AT NEWS CORP AGM

Friday saw the annual meeting of News Corp shareholders take place in Los Angeles. Anyone hoping for an apology or a resignation from the Murdochs would have been sorely disappointed. By REBECCA DAVIS.

UK BIG FOUR AUDITORS TO BE INVESTIGATED BY COMPETITION COMMISSION

The UK Office of Fair Trade is convinced that the audit market is too concentrated, and has referred the big four firms to the Competition Commission for a full-scale inquiry. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

LARGEST CELLPHONE STUDY YET – THE CONTENTS OF THIS BOX DO NOT CAUSE CANCER

It’s the fastest growing of the planet’s giant industries, a trillion-plus dollar business that reaches three out of every four people alive, and a technology that’s changed the way we work, play and communicate. Now, based on the findings of an 18-year study that examined over 350,000 subjects, it appears that the core product of this industry – your own mobile phone – is not going to kill you. By KEVIN BLOOM.

Life, etc

INDIAN GIRLS CHANGE NAMES IN MASS CEREMONY

The name “Nakusa” is commonly given to Indian girls. It’s a sign of how unpopular female children are with Indian parents – the name means “unwanted” in Hindi. By REBECCA DAVIS.

A DECADE IN THE KEY OF iPOD MAJOR

Exactly ten years ago yesterday, the world’s first iPod was released. Since then, the ubiquitous devices have transformed not just how we listen to music, but the music industry itself. By REBECCA DAVIS.

Sport

MAN CITY ROUT UNITED 6:1 IN DERBY

Manchester City put six goals past Manchester United at Old Trafford in a thrilling contest in the Premier League derby on Sunday. By FOOTBALL365.COM.

ELS GUNNING FOR SIXTH SA OPEN TITLE

Although it’s still one month away, Ernie Els says he is already turning his thoughts towards a possible sixth South African Open Championship when he returns to defend his title at the Serengeti Golf and Wildlife Estate from 24 to 27 November.

A GENERATION LATER, ALL BLACKS ARE WORLD CHAMPIONS AGAIN

World Cup finals hardly ever become the try-scoring fests of earlier parts of the tournament. This one was no different as the All Blacks scraped home by 8-7, in front of a sold-out Eden Park. By SYLI CHARALAMBOUS.

WHY THE ORCHIDS OF RWC 2011 REEK OF ONIONS – AN OVERVIEW

With the seventh edition of the Rugby World Cup now done and dusted, the new champions crowned in front of a packed Eden Park, STYLI CHARALAMBOUS takes a look back at the highs, the lows and the mixed bag of what was RWC 2011.

SOMETHING OLD, NEW, BORROWED AND BLUE AS CRICKET TESTS NEAR

We haven’t even finished with the three-match ODI series against Australia, but PAUL BERKOWITZ is already chomping at the bit to get the Tests started. The 14-man squad for the two-Test series was announced over the weekend. Meet the new (and not-so-new) players below.

LIONS BOOK HOME FINAL

The Golden Lions will host this year’s Currie Cup Final after they beat Western Province 29-20 in their semi-final in Johannesburg. By PLANETRUGBY.COM.

KJ CHOI WINS OWN TOURNAMENT

Korean star KJ Choi claimed a convincing two-stroke victory in his own tournament, the inaugural CJ Invitational, after closing with a five-under-par 67 on Sunday. By GOLF365.COM.



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