Media

iMaverick, Thursday 13 October

By iMaverick Team 13 October 2011

Mazibuko & her game-changing run; economic Codesa, SA's last chance?; great WiFi in the sky; and the Joburg Motor Show: ready... steady... Go! By iMAVERICK TEAM.

South Africa

DA DEBATES ITS RULES AS MAZIBUKO’S CAMPAIGN GOES OUT-THERE

Like the ANC, the DA seems to be constantly grappling with the rules of the game when it comes to campaigning for the election of its leaders. And the nuances are interesting, especially with its caucus elections nearing. CARIEN DU PLESSIS checked out where the main opposition party’s at.

IS ECONOMIC CODESA SA’S LAST CHANCE?

Our economic woes are so great, and anger over them so palpable at the moment, that there is a tendency to hark back to the past. We look to our successes, the things that worked for us back when our collective back was against the wall. So it’s completely understandable to have so many calls for an “Economic Codesa”, a grand meeting where we can all come together, sit around the table and talk, work on solving the nation’s problems, and you know, make a difference. The problem is, there are very few political scenarios in which that could happen. But, there is some cause for hope. Even from someone as grumpy as STEPHEN GROOTES is this week.

BLADE NZIMANDE CALLES DA ANTI-TOLL CAMPAIGN A TEA PARTY, WHILE HE TOO HATES THE TOLLS

SACP general secretary Blade Nzimande has slated the DA for running a “right-wing, tea-party campaign” against Gauteng toll roads, which is nothing like the “legitimate anger” of the SACP, Cosatu and the ANC against the project. CARIEN DU PLESSIS tried to spot the difference between the two campaigns.

JOHANNESBURG SCHOOLS STUNG BY A FRAUD MOST FOUL

Two Johannesburg schools may close after a 73-year-old cleric allegedly embezzled R20 million, leaving students looking for new schools and observers asking where the fraud stops. By GREG NICOLSON.

Opinionistas

PAUL BERKOWITZ: WHY INEQUALITY MATTERS

South Africa is one of the most unequal societies in the world. It’s worth it to examine how we’ve evolved to reject and protest against this state of affairs and what we should do about changing it.

Africa

RICHARD BRANSON: AFRICAN REVOLUTIONARY?

Did Richard Branson try to help depose Robert Mugabe in 2007? This is the intriguing claim of a newly-released WikiLeaks cable. By REBECCA DAVIS.

MAURITANIA ABOLISHES JAIL TERMS FOR JOURNALISTS

Journalists in Mauritania have welcomed the government’s recent moves towards media reform – including the passing of a law that does away with jail time for hacks who insult the president. But there are still many more steps that need to be taken on the long road to media freedom. By THERESA MALLINSON.

NIGERIA ON THE BRINK OF ‘REVOLUTION’

A scathing, searing report on Nigeria’s post-election violence was submitted this week. While the government commission of inquiry wasn’t afraid to apportion blame, its contents were more interesting for what it revealed about the future of Nigeria. Revolutions, private armies, endemic corruption and a frustrated population: hardly a recipe for a peaceful, stable Nigeria. Goodluck Jonathan’s got his work cut out for him. By SIMON ALLISON.

YOU CAN’T EAT DEMOCRACY OR FREEDOM

Forget the hype about freedom and democracy. Revolutions aren’t about fluffy political concepts, they’re about food and money, as recent protests in Khartoum demonstrate again. This is what makes people really angry, and, as the world prepares for another recession, there’s a lot more anger to come. By SIMON ALLISON.

OPEN KENYA STIMULATES NEW APP ECONOMY

Earlier this year Kenya became Africa’s first country to digitise its information as part of a wide-scale open data initiative. Not only is the initiative enabling government accountability and transparency, but it’s yielding a secondary economy with a range of apps that are being created to help people access, manage and comment on government information. By MANDY DE WAAL.

CHARTING A NEW VISION FOR EFFICIENT GROWTH, EMPLOYMENT, AND DECENT WORK IN AFRICA

International labour standards, as put forward by the International Labour Organisation, are essentially supposed to obviate issues put forward in Cosatu’s objections to Walmart entering the South African market. They are supposed to create a floor for global competition on the basis of labour by having countries worldwide set and agree to uphold minimum standards of basic worker rights and protection from inhumane labour practices. The African continent has ratified most of the standards, however, implementation lags far behind. By OSIAME MOLEFE.

World

LIFES TILL DARK FOR CHILEAN MINERS

When the Chilean miners were rescued 14 months ago in a storm of national celebration and media attention, it seemed their futures were set. Now, however, The New York Times reports they are worse off than before the mining disaster. By REBECCA DAVIS.

BURMA FREES (A FEW) POLITICAL PRISONERS

Burma has started releasing the 6,300 prisoners to be freed under a general amnesty. However, so far, only 184 of these are political prisoners. Activists say this is “absolutely not enough”. By THERESA MALLINSON.

ANOTHER GOP DEBATE OVER, IT IS NOW MITT ROMNEY’S RACE TO LOSE

On Tuesday evening, eight Republican Party candidates vying for their party’s nomination for the right to challenge Barack Obama in 2012 went for each other – but mostly at Mitt Romney – in an effort to slow down his now steady advance towards the nomination. By J BROOKS SPECTOR.

PRISONER SWAP A WIN-WIN FOR ISRAEL AND HAMAS

In a dramatic turn of events late on Tuesday, it was announced that Hamas and Israel had agreed to a prisoner swap. In return for the release of captured Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit, Israel has agreed to free a total of 1,032 Palestinian prisoners from Israeli prisons. The number of prisoners exchanged is certainly asymmetrical but both Hamas and Israel are quietly claiming a victory. By KHADIJA PATEL.

Business

AS BLACKBERRY STAYS BELLY-UP, APPLE LAUNCHES iMESSAGING

One small part of Apple’s new iOS 5 suddenly leapt to the fore due to a competitor’s enormous blunder: iMessaging for iPhone was launched on Wednesday, very probably while the BlackBerry Messaging service is still down globally. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

SAMSUNG MODIFIES GALAXY S II TO ESCAPE NETHERLANDS BAN

In order to circumvent a ban in the Netherlands, Samsung is “upgrading” three mobile phone models that were deemed to infringe on a patent held by Apple. The upgrade replaces the specific functions under dispute with new ones that apparently don’t offend Apple. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

SONY WARNS OF BURNING SONY BRAVIA TELEVISIONS

If you have Sony Bravia bought after 2007, then you might want to have it looked at. This after Sony issued a warning to its customers, following 11 incidents of the devices catching fire or melting. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

THE INTERWEBS, COMING TO SA PLANES IN 2012

SAA’s Mango should be flying six planes with on-board internet access via Wi-Fi by early next year, and other airlines won’t be far behind. That’s more inevitable than surprising. Five years from now you’ll be hard pressed to find a plane without it. BY PHILLIP DE WET.

SA IS STILL UNPROTECTED FROM DANGEROUS MULTI-PLUG UNITS

It has come to light that despite EE Publishers and The Daily Maverick drawing attention to the problem of dangerous and non-compliant multi-plug units several months ago, the same problems have arisen again. With the initial non-compliance identified, the problem has in fact widened to include a further dangerous operating mode. By CHRIS YELLAND.

Life, etc

LANGUAGE POLICE GO HIGH-TECH IN THEIR CRUSADE

The famously old-school Acade?mie Franc?aise has taken a leap into the 21st century, harnessing the power of the Internet to strengthen its project of regulating the French language. But it’s a case of “plus c?a change” for the body – since it’s going online to try to teach the French how to speak French properly. By REBECCA DAVIS.

SADDAM HUSSEIN LOOKALIKE ESCAPES PORN KIDNAP GANG

Egyptian Mohammed Bishr looks uncannily like Saddam Hussein. In a line-up, it would be difficult to tell the two apart. In a sex tape, almost impossible; at least that’s what an Iraqi gang were banking on when they tried to kidnap him to star in a porno flick. By SIMON ALLISON.

DEXTER: SLICE OF LIFE – FACEBOOK GAMING GETS GRIZZLY

One of the latest games to enter the Facebook gaming arena is Dexter: Slice of Life. And it’s no FarmVille. Instead of lovingly cultivating your crops, or whatever, you enter the murky world of Dexter Morgan, full-time cop/forensic analyst and part-time serial killer. By THERESA MALLINSON.

JOHANNESBURG INTERNATIONAL MOTOR SHOW: READY… STEADY… GO!

It’s been three years since the last Johannesburg International Motor Show – an unfortunate moniker, given that this is the only significant automotive exhibition in Africa, let alone South Africa. But let’s not let a name get in the way of what has become a truly world-class motor show. DEON SCHOEMAN toured the Expo Centre to highlight the best the 2011 JIMS has on offer.

Sport

MOLINARI AIMS TO GO ONE BETTER

After two consecutive second-placed finishes in the last two years, Francesco Molinari is hoping that this time around he can pick up a victory in the Portugal Masters. By GOLF365.COM.

COOPER BEGINS SEMI-FINAL MIND GAMES

Wallaby fly-half Quade Cooper has delved into the mind games ahead of Sunday’s semi-final against New Zealand, saying the All Blacks are the ones under all the pressure. By PLANETRUGBY.COM

AS SEASON STARTS, SA CRICKET ONCE AGAIN SUFFERS UNDER ADMIN BLUNDERS

The international cricket season is upon us again, and the Australian tour of South Africa is about to start, but PAUL BERKOWITZ is really grumpy, and he’s blaming it on Cricket South Africa for hogging headlines with issues that have zilch to do with the sport.

AMLA READY TO STEP-UP

To say that Hashim Amla is a quietly spoken man is something of an understatement – so softly does he release his words that they often struggle to reach the third row of a press conference in a small, otherwise silent room. By Tristan Holme for CRICKET365.COM.



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