Politics

iMaverick, Monday 12 September

By iMaverick Team 12 September 2011

Deon Du Plessis: a man truly larger than life goes on that great sabbatical to the sky; Spy vs spy, as Gibson Njenje resigns – or not; Malema's long walk to freedom from ANC charges; and Springboks survives Wales, just. By iMAVERICK TEAM.

South Africa

MALEMA’S LAST HURRAH BEFORE THE DC BEGAN IN EARNEST

A day before his disciplinary hearing started anew at an undisclosed location, ANC Youth League president visited the Scwetla informal settlement in Alexandra to breathe some fire and brimstone on all and sundry. It was a fist waved defiantly in the air – and less than 24 hours later, the ANC machinery rolled quietly over him. Again. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

DEON DU PLESSIS: A MAN TRULY LARGER THAN LIFE GOES ON THAT GREAT SABBATICAL IN THE SKY

The white hyena, the gun-loving boer, that great newspaper man who gave SA’s blue-collared hordes news worth reading is no more. In his place a giant of a legacy – a tabloid every flailing newspaper’s trying to copy in a sector where the Daily Sun remains unrivaled. By MANDY DE WAAL.

SPY WARS, EPISODE TWO: NJENJE TO SHED LIGHT ON ‘RESIGNATION’

It’s smoke and mirrors in South Africa’s spook world again as spy boss Gibson Njenje’s resignation is announced and then denied, with an explanation expected on Monday. Meanwhile, the DA is doing what it does best in times of uncertainty – writing letters to the minister. CARIEN DU PLESSIS reports.

MALEMA’S DISCIPLINARY IS LIKELY TO BE A SLOW, LONG, DRAWN-OUT AFFAIR

What started as a hearing scheduled for four days, is now becoming a drawn-out affair as disciplinary proceedings against ANC Youth League leader Julius Malema chug on – and is delayed by technicalities and other events again – such as the ruling in his hate speech case on Monday. CARIEN DU PLESSIS reports.

Opinionistas

SIPHO HLONGWANE: BLACK BUSINESS COUNCIL: WRONG STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION?

Last week, several black professional organisations split from Business Unity SA to form the Black Business Council. While it may be understandable to react to a perceived snail’s pace of transformation in business, is forming a new race-defined lobby group the right move, or should business people rather stick it out in Busa? In fact, is it even Busa’s task to transform business in South Africa?

Africa

THE MYSTERY OF GADDAFI’S ABSENT AMAZONS

They captured the imagination of the world: a team of Amazonian female bodyguards who travelled everywhere with deposed Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi. But what has become of them since the rebels took power? By REBECCA DAVIS.

HUNDREDS DROWN IN ZANZIBAR FERRY DISASTER

When a thousand people cram onto a boat designed for little over half that number, an overwhelming tragedy is only a strong wave away. The ferry which capsized off the coast of Zanzibar this weekend was just such a boat. By SIMON ALLISON.

NAIROBI LAW MONTHLY OFFICES RAIDED, BUT PUBLISHER UNDETERRED

The thieves who broke into the magazine’s offices in the early hours of Friday morning have not yet been caught. But already people are pointing fingers at state involvement as the publication is set to expose government corruption in its next issue. By THERESA MALLINSON.

THE LORD’S RESISTANCE ARMY RETURNS TO ACTION IN SOUTH SUDAN

The Lord’s Resistance Army has been quiet of late, but a cross-border raid on a South Sudanese village shows they’re still in business, and still as dangerous and unpredictable as ever. By SIMON ALLISON.

ANALYSIS: MUGABE’S RIGHT TO BAN WESTERN ELECTION OBSERVERS, AND HERE’S WHY

Robert Mugabe announced he does not intend to allow western election observers into Zimbabwe to monitor the coming presidential polls. It’s tempting to dismiss this as the opening gambit of a man who knows that his country’s elections will not be free and fair, indeed of a man who has a track record of rigged elections and the means and willingness to do it again. But that doesn’t mean it’s a bad idea. By SIMON ALLISON.

World

TEN YEARS ON: HOW THE MEDIA SAW 9/11

If you weren’t interested in the ten-year anniversary of the terror attacks of 9/11 on Sunday, there was little point in your engaging with international media. The milestone date dominated front pages from Tucson to Tokyo. By REBECCA DAVIS.

ISRAEL VS EGYPT – TROUBLE FLARES

Trouble is kicking off in Cairo, where protesters surrounded the Israeli embassy this weekend to express outrage at the killing of Egyptian security officers by Israeli forces. The two countries are now staring down the barrel of the worst diplomatic clash between them for 30 years. By REBECCA DAVIS.

FUKUSHIMA: JAPAN’S SEPTEMBER 11

Only a week into the job, Japan’s economy, trade and industry minister was forced to resign this weekend over offensive comments about Fukushima, the site of the nuclear crisis brought on by the 11 March earthquakes and tsunamis. By REBECCA DAVIS.

VIEW FROM MIDDLE AMERICA: WHY US LITERATURE HAS FAILED 9/11

US commemorations of the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks have been happening from sea to shining sea over the last few weeks, with literature serving as an important avenue into an understanding of the ongoing impact. But has American literature lived up to the enormity of the event? KEVIN BLOOM reports from a panel discussion in Iowa City.

Life, etc

LACOSTE TO BREIVIK: WHAT NOT TO WEAR

Fashion label Lacoste’s crocodile logo is recognisable around the world. Problem is that it’s recently been spotted on the chest of Norwegian rightwing extremist Andries Breivik – not at all a desirable association. Lacoste has asked that he stop wearing their clothes, but what are the chances of him agreeing? By THERESA MALLINSON.

KING JAMES BIBLE, 400 YEARS LATER

The King James Bible has been called “the most influential version of the most influential book in the world” and “the most celebrated book in the English-speaking world”. For some it is a “good read” but it’s also been called an “abominable translation”. By J BROOKS SPECTOR.

MICHAEL HART, INVENTOR OF E-BOOK, CLOSES THE CHAPTER

In many ways Michael Hart was a typical nerd, with typical nerdy quirks, like his penchant for adding sugar to pizza. In other ways, he completely changed the world. If we gently modify Psalm 25:8 to read, “the geek shall inherit the earth”, then along with Steve Jobs, Bill Gates and a handful of other early visionaries, the planet belongs to Hart. The founder of the legendary Project Gutenberg, and thus the inventor of the e-book, died this week at the age of 64. He will be remembered as one of the fathers of the information age. By RICHARD POPLAK.

AU SEDIBA: OLD BONES PROMISE NEW UNDERSTANDING

The Australopethicus sediba fossils, found near South Africa’s Cradle of Humankind, aren’t exactly the missing link – scientists don’t give much credence to this layman’s term anyway – but do belong to a transitional species. And they could go some way to clearing up “the muddle in the middle” of human evolution. By THERESA MALLINSON.

Sport

BOKS SCRAPE THROUGH IN WELLINGTON THRILLER

For much of the second half, many fans wearing the green and gold of South Africa, would have been down to their knuckles during this nail-biter of a Test match. STYLI CHARALAMBOUS reviews the Boks’ nervous 17-16 win over Wales.

VETTEL VICTORIOUS AT MONZA

Sebastian Vettel was not under any pressure at all as he romped home on Sunday to win the Italian Grand Prix. Even going into the first corner with Fernando Alonso just ahead and Lewis Hamilton barrelling down his left on the outside, the German’s performance was so strong you had to suspect he’d easily find his way back to the front. By OSIAME MOLEFE.

RUGBY WORLD CUP ALL-TIME GREATEST XV

With the 2011 tournament in full swing, we thought we’d take a look back through the history books and do something that is sure to stir some debate, pick an all-time greatest Rugby World Cup starting XV. By STYLI CHARALAMBOUS.



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