First Thing, Daily Maverick's flagship newsletter

Join the 230 000 South Africans who read First Thing newsletter.

We'd like our readers to start paying for Daily Maverick

More specifically, we'd like those who can afford to pay to start paying. What it comes down to is whether or not you value Daily Maverick. Think of us in terms of your daily cappuccino from your favourite coffee shop. It costs around R35. That’s R1,050 per month on frothy milk. Don’t get us wrong, we’re almost exclusively fuelled by coffee. BUT maybe R200 of that R1,050 could go to the journalism that’s fighting for the country?

We don’t dictate how much we’d like our readers to contribute. After all, how much you value our work is subjective (and frankly, every amount helps). At R200, you get it back in Uber Eats and ride vouchers every month, but that’s just a suggestion. A little less than a week’s worth of cappuccinos.

We can't survive on hope and our own determination. Our country is going to be considerably worse off if we don’t have a strong, sustainable news media. If you’re rejigging your budgets, and it comes to choosing between frothy milk and Daily Maverick, we hope you might reconsider that cappuccino.

We need your help. And we’re not ashamed to ask for it.

Our mission is to Defend Truth. Join Maverick Insider.

Support Daily Maverick→
Payment options

Armenia, Turkey finally connect for diplomatic ties

Defend Truth

Armenia, Turkey finally connect for diplomatic ties

Senior Armenian and Turkish officials travelled to Switzerland on Saturday to sign an agreement to put them on a course to end a century of hostility stemming from brutal massacres at the end of the Ottoman Empire. The signing ceremony was delayed over last-minute issues and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, there to witness it, had to cool her heels in a hotel until it all got sorted out. The Swiss had been quietly working on this accord over the past two years, with the help of the French, Russian and Americans. Turkey and Armenia’s parliaments must still weigh in – something that is certain to be enormously entertaining. Muslim Turkey and Christian Armenia have had bitter relations since violence in 1915 left hundreds of thousands – perhaps millions - of ethnic Armenians dead. Armenia was a province of Turkey, then the Ottoman Empire, fighting Russia during World War I. The Armenian issue has a special life in American politics as well. Armenian Americans insist Congress recognise the charge of genocide, even if that strains US-Turkish relations within Nato and with Turkey’s support for US missions in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Gallery

Please peer review 3 community comments before your comment can be posted