Analysis of the third kind
17 August 2017 21:06 (South Africa)

Camera focused on Camara’s Guinea violence

  • Branko Brkic
    branko3048 a ray
    Branko Brkic

    Brkic is the founder and editor of The Daily Maverick.

    He has edited magazines on business and politics, technology, and wildlife. He has also published fiction and non-fiction books, most of them in Serbian. Though he has never pretended to be a reporter, his wide knowledge of politics (especially in America), combined with his experiences in a disintegrating Yugoslavia, gives him an unusual outlook on events in South Africa.

    Despite the vowel-poor surname, he tells anyone who asks that he hails from Hyde Park, Johannesburg, having spent most of his adult life in South Africa.

    Recent columns:

C:\fake_path\guinea

In a case of the workman blaming his tools, Guinea's military leader Captain Moussa Dadis Camara banned all "subversive" gatherings days after soldiers killed up to 200 people in street demonstrations in the capital Conakry. The leader of a December coup, who now wants to run in January presidential elections, said troublemakers would be severely punished. These troublemakers appear to include opposition politicians, some 50,000 people who rallied against him, and "uncontrollable" elements in the military. Camara’s post-coup promises to step down after overseeing a transition back to civilian rule are sounding ever more hollow. The action by the army closely resembles its behaviour under his predecessor Lasana Conte, who ruled from 1984 until he died last year. In 2007 security forces killed more than 100 civilians participating in a strike over the release from prison of corrupt government officials. Troops later went on a rampage of torture, theft and rape.

  • Branko Brkic
    branko3048 a ray
    Branko Brkic

    Brkic is the founder and editor of The Daily Maverick.

    He has edited magazines on business and politics, technology, and wildlife. He has also published fiction and non-fiction books, most of them in Serbian. Though he has never pretended to be a reporter, his wide knowledge of politics (especially in America), combined with his experiences in a disintegrating Yugoslavia, gives him an unusual outlook on events in South Africa.

    Despite the vowel-poor surname, he tells anyone who asks that he hails from Hyde Park, Johannesburg, having spent most of his adult life in South Africa.

    Recent columns:

Get overnight news and latest Daily Maverick articles






Do Not Miss