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Nigeria to Sony: "District 9" is bad muti

Defend Truth

Nigeria to Sony: “District 9” is bad muti

Nigeria's information minister says “District 9” is not welcome in Nigeria because it portrays Nigerians as gangsters and cannibals.  Ok. Information Minister Dora Akunyili says she's asked movie houses to stop screening "District 9" because the SF sensation makes Nigerians look bad as criminals, weapons smugglers and alien body parts consumers.  She announced Nigeria has asked Sony, the film’s distributor, for an apology and for Sony to edit out the Nigerian antagonists as well as the name of the main Nigerian gangster, Obesandjo.  Despite Nigerian criticism, the film is doing gangbusters in America and internationally -- and has already more than recouped its production costs.  Directed by an émigré South African, featuring a nearly all-SA cast, and shot on location in gritty Johannesburg locations, the film posits an alien space ship over Johannesburg, filled with alien refugees known derisively as “prawns” -- and human plans to relocate them far, far out of town – or else.If you knew what health care really cost, would you buy one?

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