Provocation triple distilled
1 October 2016 03:25 (South Africa)
Wired World

Turkey grounds Syrian plane, military cargo suspected

  • Reuters
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    Reuters

    Thomson Reuters is the world's leading source of intelligent informatiom for businesses and professionals. It combines industry expertise with innovative technology to deliver critical information to leading decision makers in the financial, legal, tax and accounting, healthcare, science and media markets.

  • Wired World
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Turkey forced a Syrian passenger plane en route from Moscow to Damascus to land in Ankara on Wednesday on suspicion that it was carrying military equipment destined for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's forces, Turkey's foreign minister said. By Gulsen Solaker.

Turkish fighter planes escorted the Syrian plane, which was carrying around 30 passengers, into the airport in Ankara after Turkish authorities received information that it was carrying "non-civilian" cargo which had not been registered.

"We are determined to control weapons transfers to a regime that carries out such brutal massacres against civilians. It is unacceptable that such a transfer is made using our airspace," Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu said.

"Today we received information that this plane was carrying cargo of a nature that could not possibly be in compliance with the rules of civil aviation," he said on Turkish television.

Tensions between Turkey and Syria, once close allies, have become increasingly strained during the rebellion in Syria against President Bashar al-Assad.

Davutoglu said Turkey was within its rights to investigate planes suspected to be carrying military materials and that the plane would be allowed to continue if it was found to be clean. He declined to comment on what the banned materials might be.

He said Turkey would continue to investigate Syrian civilian aircraft using its airspace.

He also said Syrian air space was no longer safe and that Turkish passenger planes should not fly there. A Reuters witness at the border saw at least one passenger plane turn around as it approached Syria and head back into Turkey on Wednesday.

Turkey's armed forces have bolstered their presence along the 900-km (560-mile) border and have been firing back over the past week in response to gunfire and shelling coming from northern Syria, where Assad's forces have been battling rebels who control swathes of territory.

The Syrian government has made heavy use of air power and artillery to halt rebel advances in the conflict, now in its 19th month. DM

Photo: A Syrian passenger plane which was forced to land sits at Esenboga airport in Ankara October 10, 2012. Turkey scrambled fighter planes to force a Syrian passenger plane en route from Moscow to land in Ankara on Wednesday and banned Turkish civilian aircraft from flying in Syrian airspace, state-run TRT television said. REUTERS/Cem Oksuz/Anadolu Agency 

  • Reuters
    reuters_twitter_avatar_normal
    Reuters

    Thomson Reuters is the world's leading source of intelligent informatiom for businesses and professionals. It combines industry expertise with innovative technology to deliver critical information to leading decision makers in the financial, legal, tax and accounting, healthcare, science and media markets.

  • Wired World

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